Muckle Roe

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Muckle Roe
Location
Muckle Roe is located in Shetland
Muckle Roe
Muckle Roe
Muckle Roe shown within the Shetland Islands
OS grid reference HU317650
Names
Norse name Rauðøy Mikla[1]
Meaning of name big red island
Area and summit
Area 1,773 hectares (6.8 sq mi)
Area rank 37[3]
Highest elevation Mid Ward 172 metres (564 ft)[2]
Population
Population 130[4]
Population rank 43[3]
Pop. density 7.3people/km2[4][5]
Main settlement Roesound
Groupings
Island group Shetland
Local Authority Shetland Islands
Flag of Scotland.svg Lymphad3.svg
References [2][5][6][7]

Muckle Roe is an island in Shetland, Scotland, in St. Magnus Bay, to the west of Mainland, Shetland. It has a population of around 130 people, who mainly croft and live in the south east of the island.[7][8]

History[edit]

The island is referred to in the Orkneyinga saga.[9]

The new bridge, looking south towards Muckle Roe

In 1905 a bridge was built between Muckle Roe and the Shetland Mainland over Roe Sound at a cost of £1,020 met from public subscription and a grant from the Congested Districts Board. The construction was of iron and concrete[7][10] and its completion was followed by a reversal in the population decline seen in the 19th and earlier 20th centuries. A replacement bridge was built in 1999.

Geography and geology[edit]

Muckle Ayre Beach

Muckle Roe is approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) in diameter, with high cliffs in the south. Its highest point is Mid Ward 172 metres (564 ft).

The island's rock is red granite,[8] which gives the island its name - a combination of Scots and Old Norse meaning "big red island".[5][7]

There are crofts in the east and south east. The rest of the island is lochan-studded moorland.[11]

Population[edit]

Year Number of
inhabitants
[4][5]
1851
290
1871
216
1881
230
1961
103
1971
94
1981
101
1991
115
2001
104
2011
130


Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Waugh (2007) p. 541
  2. ^ a b Ordnance Survey. Get-a-map (Map). 1:25,000. Leisure. http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/getamap/. Retrieved 21 August 2013.
  3. ^ a b Area and population ranks: there are c. 300 islands >20ha in extent and 93 permanently inhabited islands were listed in the 2011 census.
  4. ^ a b c National Records of Scotland (15 August 2013) (pdf) Statistical Bulletin: 2011 Census: First Results on Population and Household Estimates for Scotland - Release 1C (Part Two). "Appendix 2: Population and households on Scotland’s inhabited islands". Retrieved 17 August 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d Haswell-Smith (2004) p. 406
  6. ^ Fraser, Allen (2002) The Edinburgh Geologist: Old Norse and Norn names in Shetland. Issue 39 Retrieved 14 April 2007.
  7. ^ a b c d Keay & Keay, (1994) p. 711
  8. ^ a b Haswell-Smith (2004) p. 440
  9. ^ Anderson, Joseph (Ed.) (1893) Orkneyinga Saga. Translated by Jón A. Hjaltalin & Gilbert Goudie. Edinburgh. James Thin and Mercat Press (1990 reprint). ISBN 0-901824-25-9
  10. ^ Nicolson (1972) p. 108
  11. ^ "Overview of Muckle Roe". Gazetteer for Scotland. Retrieved 2008-01-06. 

References[edit]

  • Keay, J. & Keay, J. (1994) Collins Encyclopaedia of Scotland. London. HarperCollins.
  • Nicolson, James R. (1972) Shetland. Newton Abbott. David & Charles.
  • Waugh, Doreen "Placing Papa Stour in Context" in Ballin Smith, Beverley; Taylor, Simon; and Williams, Gareth (2007) West over Sea: Studies in Scandinavian Sea-Borne Expansion and Settlement Before 1300. Leiden. Brill. ISBN 97890-04-15893-1

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 60°22′N 1°25.5′W / 60.367°N 1.4250°W / 60.367; -1.4250