Muir of Ord railway station

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Muir of Ord National Rail
Muir of Ord
Location
Place Muir of Ord
Local authority Highland
Coordinates 57°31′03″N 4°27′37″W / 57.5175°N 4.4602°W / 57.5175; -4.4602Coordinates: 57°31′03″N 4°27′37″W / 57.5175°N 4.4602°W / 57.5175; -4.4602
Grid reference NH527501
Operations
Station code MOO
Managed by First ScotRail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures and station information
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2004/05  24,365
2005/06 Increase 24,783
2006/07 Increase 32,573
2007/08 Increase 39,200
2008/09 Increase 51,104
2009/10 Increase 57,396
2010/11 Increase 62,428
2011/12 Increase 74,462
2012/13 Decrease 74,064
History
Original company Inverness and Ross-shire Railway
Pre-grouping Highland Railway
Post-grouping LMS
11 June 1862 Opened[1]
13 June 1960 Closed
4 October 1976 Reopened
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Muir of Ord from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
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Muir of Ord railway station is a railway station on the Kyle of Lochalsh Line and the Far North Line, serving the village of Muir of Ord in the Highland council area of Scotland. It is the location of the sole remaining crossing loop on the single line between Dingwall and Inverness.

History[edit]

Muir of Ord railway station was once the junction of a branch railway to Fortrose. The station building and platform canopy were erected in 1894.[2]

Passenger services on the branch ceased on 1 October 1951, but the branch remained open for freight until 13 June 1960.

After the railway bridge across the River Ness washed away in February 1989, isolating the entire network north of Inverness, Muir of Ord was chosen as the location for a temporary depot, from which the stranded rolling stock could operate the service to the highland communities which depended on the line.

Increased services have increased usage dramatically (see right).

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Beauly   First ScotRail
Far North Line
Kyle of Lochalsh Line
  Conon Bridge
Historical railways
Beauly   Inverness and Ross-shire Railway
Highland Railway
  Conon
Terminus   Fortrose Branch
Highland Railway
  Redcastle

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Butt (1995)
  2. ^ The Buildings of Scotland, Highland and Islands. John Gifford. Yale University Press. 1992. ISBN 0-300-09625-9

Sources[edit]