Mujib Bahini

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Mujib Bahini or the Bangladesh Liberation Force (BLF) was part of the Bangladesh Mukti Bahini, a guerrilla force fighting against Pakistan in the Bangladesh Liberation War in 1971.[1] Mujib Bahini was a special force created by the Awami League and composed of 60,000 young supporters of the liberation movement.[2] It was organised with the active assistance of Major General Sujan Singh Uban of the Indian Army. Student League leaders Serajul Alam Khan and Sheikh Fazlul Haque Mani, Tofael Ahmed, [3][dead link]and Abdur Razzaq, MP were the organizers of this special force. It is alleged that this force was formed during the concluding part of Liberation War according to the policy of Awami League and the ally, India, aimed against the leftist freedom fighters to bar them from taking the lead in the War.[4]

1971 War of Independence[edit]

It is alleged that this force was formed during the concluding part of Liberation War according to the policy of Awami League and the ally, India, aimed against the leftist freedom fighters to bar them from taking the lead in the War.[4] It is accused of being involved in hooliganism and looting after the end of War of Independence.[5]

Professor Serajul Islam Choudhury of Dhaka University opined that Mujib Bahini sowed rift between Sheikh Mujibur Rahman and Tajuddin Ahmed and contributed to his downfall.[6]

After 1971[edit]

After the Bangladesh Liberation War of 1971, the Mujib Bahini was merged with the auxiliary Jatiya Rakkhi Bahini, which became infamous for its own human rights abuses.[6]


Some former members were rewarded by the Indian government and decided to become Indian citizens themselves. Bimal Pramanik, the director of Centre for Research in India-Bangladesh Relations, was a former sector commander of Mujib Bahini. He fled Bangladesh in the aftermath of Mujib's assassination in 1975 and shifted to Kolkata in 1976; he has been living in the city since then.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ahmed, Helal Uddin. "Mujib Bahini". Banglapedia. Bangladesh Asiatic Society. Retrieved 13 February 2015. 
  2. ^ Jahan, Rounaq (February 1973). "Bangladesh in 1972: Nation Building in a New State". Asian Survey (University of California Press) 13 (2): 199–210. doi:10.1525/as.1973.13.2.01p0305i. JSTOR 2642736. 
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ a b Ahmed, Taib; Islam, Khadimul (16 December 2014). "‘Mujib Bahini didn’t fight liberation war’". The New Age. The New Age. Retrieved 11 February 2015. 
  5. ^ "AK Khandker sued for 'Mujib Bahini's looting' claim". 10 September 2014. Retrieved 4 March 2015. 
  6. ^ a b "Mujib Bahini sowed rift between Bangabandhu, Tajuddin". The Daily Star. 7 September 2014. Retrieved 28 February 2015. 
  7. ^ "'History has come full circle' Mujib Bahini". Times of India. Times of India. 20 November 2009. Retrieved 28 February 2015.