Multiple barrel firearm

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U.S. Special Warfare combatant-craft crewmen use an M134 multiple-barrel machine gun to lay down suppressing fire during a practice "hot" extraction of forces on a beach.

A multiple barrel firearm is a firearm of any type with more than one barrel, usually to increase the rate of fire/hitting probability and to reduce barrel erosion/overheating.[1]

Definition[edit]

A multiple barrel firearm is any firearm with more than one barrel (usually in the same calibre), to increase the rate of fire/hitting probability and to reduce barrel erosion/overheating. Originally a primitive (and with the invention of the Gatling gun, successful) attempt of rapid fire before the introduction of belt-feed/magazines and automatic weapons. Project SALVO concluded that any Multi Barrel Assault Rifle/Machine Gun with a rifle calibre above 5.56 x 45 mm NATO and the possible exception of Pistol/Intermediate rounds (IE: 9 x 19 mm Parabellum, .30 Carbine, 7.62 x 39 mm M43) would be for infantry use.

History[edit]

Ottoman Empire volley gun with 8 barrels, early 16th century

Multiple barrel firearms date back to the 1300s, when the first volley guns were developed.[2] Originally a primitive attempt of rapid fire before the introduction of belt-feed/magazines and automatic weapons, the application of multiple barrels to modern automatic weapons such as the M134 Minigun have effective performance on the battlefield.

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References[edit]