Mulvane, Kansas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Mulvane, Kansas
City
Motto: Courtesy, Competence, Commitment
Location of Mulvane, Kansas
Location of Mulvane, Kansas
Detailed map of Mulvane, Kansas
Detailed map of Mulvane, Kansas
Coordinates: 37°28′47″N 97°14′32″W / 37.47972°N 97.24222°W / 37.47972; -97.24222Coordinates: 37°28′47″N 97°14′32″W / 37.47972°N 97.24222°W / 37.47972; -97.24222
Country United States
State Kansas
Counties Sedgwick, Sumner
Incorporated 1883
Government
 • Mayor Jim Ford
Area[1]
 • Total 4.52 sq mi (11.71 km2)
 • Land 4.50 sq mi (11.65 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation 1,234 ft (376 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 6,111
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 6,267
 • Density 1,358.0/sq mi (524.3/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 67110
Area code(s) 316
FIPS code 20-49100[4]
GNIS feature ID 0470229[5]
Website www.MulvaneKansas.com

Mulvane is a city in Sedgwick and Sumner counties in the U.S. state of Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 6,111.[6]

History[edit]

1915 Railroad Map of Sedgwick County

Mulvane was founded in August 1879 at the junction of five Santa Fe rail lines. It is named for Joab R. Mulvane. Mr. Mulvane came to Kansas in 1876.[citation needed] He resided in Topeka and in his later years spent the summer season at his island estate on Crab Lake in northern Wisconsin.[citation needed] Joab Mulvane was perhaps the most successful Kansan of his generation.[citation needed] The breadth of his interests has shaped modern Kansas and far beyond especially in shipping logistics and the strategic advantage of Kansas as a single point distribution hub for North America[7] which means his work had profound and lasting impacts. He brought many elements of the Santa Fe Railway together. He was president of at least nine railroads and he presided over the Chicago, Kansas and Western Railway Company, as its President, when it built over 900 miles of rail lines for the Santa Fe.[citation needed]. Some of his other interests included: President of: the Kansas Town Company, the Quivera Town and Land Company (which incorporated Argentine, KS in 1881),the Edison Electric Light Company of Topeka, Shawnee Fire Insurance Company, the Kansas Salt Company. He was interlocked in various other companies as vice-president or treasurer. He was a major stockholder and director of the Bank of Topeka.[8] He was married to Miss Sarah A. Ross of Ohio who hails from the famous Whitaker Steel Family. Joab Mulvane was responsible for the location of the important junction city that bears his name.[citation needed]

Mulvane's Main Street follows part of the Sedgwick and Sumner county lines, and the town center is about five miles west of the spot where Sedgwick, Sumner, Butler and Cowley counties meet.

Mulvane is also home of the Patriot Guard Riders. The Patriot Guard was established in Mulvane, Kansas at American Legion Post 136 in 2005. The founding members incorporated the organization as a 501(c)(3) non-profit in the State of Oklahoma on February 21, 2006.

Geography[edit]

Mulvane is located at 37°28′47″N 97°14′32″W / 37.47972°N 97.24222°W / 37.47972; -97.24222 (37.479746, -97.242309)[9]. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.52 square miles (11.71 km2), of which, 4.50 square miles (11.65 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

Area events and attractions[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1990 4,674
2000 5,155 10.3%
2010 6,111 18.5%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 6,111 people, 2,244 households, and 1,661 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,358.0 inhabitants per square mile (524.3 /km2). There were 2,357 housing units at an average density of 523.8 per square mile (202.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.4% White, 0.6% African American, 1.1% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.7% from other races, and 2.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.5% of the population.

There were 2,244 households of which 40.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.3% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 26.0% were non-families. 23.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.18.

The median age in the city was 35.1 years. 30.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.5% were from 25 to 44; 24.2% were from 45 to 64; and 13.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.0% male and 52.0% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 5,155 people, 1,896 households, and 1,444 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,261.1 people per square mile (873.0/km²). There were 1,963 housing units at an average density of 861.0 per square mile (332.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.39% White, 0.17% African American, 0.99% Native American, 0.29% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.60% from other races, and 1.49% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.58% of the population.

There were 1,896 households of which 41.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.0% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.8% were non-families. 21.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the city the population was spread out with 30.4% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 11.7% were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 93.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $46,923, and the median income for a family was $56,285. Males had a median income of $39,732 versus $26,797 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,523. About 2.1% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 1.6% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Unified School District 263 operates public schools within the city limits. Mulvane Elementary school teaches grades kindergarten through 5th grade, while Mulvane Middle School teaches 6th through 8th, and Mulvane High School teaches 9th though 12th.

Cowley County Community College operates two satellite campuses within city limits.

Notable people[edit]

2005 KDOT Map of Sedgwick County showing Goddard and surrounding communities (map legend)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Mulvane's Early Years: 1876-1918". Swope Design. Retrieved 5 January 2009. 
  8. ^ William E. Connelley. "Joab Mulvane". A Standard History of Kansas and Kansans. Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka. Retrieved 5 January 2009. 
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  10. ^ "A Golden Gate Fantasy on the Kansas Prairie" article by A.G. Suleberger in The New York Times September 15, 2010, accessed September 16, 2010

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Maps