Munich 1941 chess tournament

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The Second Europaturnier was held from 8 to 14 September 1941 in Munich. The event was organised by Ehrhardt Post, the Chief Executive of Nazi Grossdeutscher Schachbund. The First Europaturnier had taken place in Stuttgart in May 1939.

Results[edit]

The event was won by Gösta Stoltz,[1] who scored a spectacular victory with 1½ points ahead of Alexander Alekhine and Erik Lundin. Stoltz won 1,000 Reichsmarks and received a trophy that was donated by Bavarian Ministerpräsident at the time Ludwig Siebert. The trophy was made of Meissen porcelain and worth close to $1,000.[2]

The results and standings:[3][4]

# Player Country 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Total
1 Gösta Stoltz  Sweden x ½ 1 0 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 12
2-3 Alexander Alekhine  France ½ x ½ 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ 0 1 1 1 10½
2-3 Erik Lundin  Sweden 0 ½ x 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 10½
4 Efim Bogoljubow  Germany 1 0 1 x ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1
5-6 Bjørn Nielsen  Denmark 0 1 ½ ½ x 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 9
5-6 Kurt Richter  Germany 0 0 0 1 0 x ½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 9
7 Jan Foltys Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia Bohemia and Moravia 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ x 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 0 1 ½ 8
8 Pál Réthy  Hungary ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 1 0 x 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 1
9-10 Braslav Rabar  Independent State of Croatia 0 0 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 x ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 7
9-10 Georg Kieninger  Germany ½ 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 ½ ½ x ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 7
11 Géza Füster  Hungary 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ x 0 1 0 0 1
12 Paul Mross  Germany 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 1 x ½ 1 ½ 1 6
13 Karel Opočenský Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia Bohemia and Moravia 0 1 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ x ½ 1 ½
14-15 Ivan Vladimir Rohaček  Slovakia ½ 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 ½ ½ 1 0 ½ x ½ 0
14-15 Nicolaas Cortlever  Netherlands 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ x 1
16 Peter Leepin   Switzerland 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ 1 0 x 3

Max Euwe's rejection[edit]

Former world champion Max Euwe declined the invitation due to "occupational obligations" as manager of a groceries business. He would later decline the invitation to a similar event, Salzburg 1942 chess tournament for futile reasons. It is speculated that the real motive was the invitation of Alexander Alekhine, who had written antisemitic articles. Among others, Alekhine had written about the "Jewish clique" around Euwe in the World Chess Championship 1935.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alekhine's account of the Munich tournament
  2. ^ "Chess Notes by Edward Winter". Chesshistory.com. Retrieved 2014-01-24. 
  3. ^ [1][dead link][dead link]
  4. ^ All matches played at Munich 1942.
  5. ^ "Salzburg 1942". Endgame.nl. 1942-06-18. Retrieved 2014-01-24. 
  6. ^ "Alekhine and the Nazis". Web.archive.org. 2009-10-28. Retrieved 2014-01-24.