Murray Adams-Acton

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Murray Adams-Acton (1886–1971) was an English historian of art and architecture and interior designer of considerable flamboyance.[1][2] He designed the dining room to Shirenewton Hall in 1910 and the interiors of a men's outfitter's shop, Swan & Edgar's in Piccadilly, renovating it before it reopened in 1927.[3] Book Review Digest described him in 1930 as a "charming draftsman".[4] He was also adept as a furniture designer and inventor, and made numerous items including a toaster.[5] As an expert, he also authored numerous publications on design, such as Domestic Architecture and Old Furniture and The Genesis and Development of Linenfold Panelling (1945).[6][7] He also produced work about ecclesiastical architecture in France.[8] Adams-Acton was also a keen gardener, noted in particular for his rhododendron cultivation in the 1940s.[9][10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ADAMS-ACTON". Richardford Manuscripts. Retrieved 12 July 2012. 
  2. ^ "Frank Surgey - a short history 1890-1974". Lifechart. Retrieved 12 July 2012. 
  3. ^ The Studio year-book of decorative art. The Studio. 1911. Retrieved 12 July 2012. 
  4. ^ H.W. Wilson Company (1930). Book review digest. H.W. Wilson Co. Retrieved 12 July 2012. 
  5. ^ Frederic Gordon Roe (1961). English cottage furniture. Phoenix House. Retrieved 12 July 2012. 
  6. ^ Old furniture: a magazine of domestic ornament. Old Furniture. 1929. Retrieved 12 July 2012. 
  7. ^ Harris, John (28 September 2007). Moving Rooms. Yale University Press. p. 276. ISBN 978-0-300-12420-0. Retrieved 12 July 2012. 
  8. ^ Glover, R. Sydney; Sutton, Denys (1976). Apollo. Apollo. Retrieved 12 July 2012. 
  9. ^ Gardeners' chronicle, horticultural trade journal. Haymarket Publishing. 1 January 1944. p. 202. Retrieved 12 July 2012. 
  10. ^ Royal Horticultural Society (Great Britain) (1971). The Rhododendron and camellia year book. Royal Horticultural Society. p. 73. Retrieved 12 July 2012.