Musa coccinea

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Scarlet Banana
Berthe Hoola van Nooten02.jpg
Illustration of Musa coccinea inflorescence.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
(unranked): Commelinids
Order: Zingiberales
Family: Musaceae
Genus: Musa
Species: M. coccinea
Binomial name
Musa coccinea
Andrews[1]
Synonyms[2]

Quesnelia lamarckii Baker

Musa coccinea, commonly known as scarlet banana[3] or red-flowering banana,[4] is a bat-pollinated[5] plant in the banana and plantain family native to tropical China (in Guangdong, Guangxi, and southeastern Yunnan) and Vietnam.[3] It is placed in section Callimusa (now including the former section Australimusa), having a diploid chromosome number of 2n = 20.[6]

The flower cluster is more rounded than in the related species M. beccarii. It is made up of erect spirals of red bracts which enclose tubular yellow flowers. The fruits are orange, only about 2 cm (0.8 in) long, and contain seeds.[7] The species is cultivated for its ornamental value,[3] being grown, for example, along with heliconias in commercial farms in Hawai'i.[7]

M. coccinea is a known host in the New World of the red palm mite (Raoiella indica).[4]

Taxonomy[edit]

Musa coccinea was described by Andrews in 1799. M. ouranoscopos Lour. (an illegitimate name) is often incorrectly given as a synonym. Loureiro's 1790 account is confused. He refers to an illustration in Rumphius' 1747 Herbarium Amboinense, hence this is the type of his name. However, this illustration had previously been used in Linnaeus' description of M. troglodytarum, so M. ouranoscopos Lour. is a superfluous name for M. troglodytarum. Loureiro's description is of M. coccinea; however the type rather than the description determines the synonymity, so M. ouranoscopos Lour. is not a synonym of M. coccinea.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^  Musa coccinea was originally described and published in Botanist's Repository, for new, and rare plants. 1: , pl. 47. 1799. "Name - !Musa coccinea Andrews". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved June 4, 2011. "Type-Protologue: Locality: Thomas Evans received it about the year 1792, from China. Our figure was taken, in part, from a plant which flowered at James Vere’s, last December [sic], and partly from one in blossom about the same time, at the Hon. Lady Archer’s" 
  2. ^ "Musa coccinea", World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, retrieved 2013-01-24 
  3. ^ a b c GRIN (November 18, 2009). "Musa coccinea information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved June 4, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b Cal Welbourn (May 1, 2009). "Pest Alert for Red palm mite Raoiella indica Hirst (Acari: Tenuipalpidae)". Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry. Retrieved June 4, 2011. 
  5. ^ Theodore H. Fleming, Cullen Geiselman, and W. John Kress (November 2009). "The evolution of bat pollination: a phylogenetic perspective". Annals of Botany (Oxford University Press) 104 (6): 1017–1043. doi:10.1093/aob/mcp197. PMC 2766192. PMID 19789175. Retrieved June 4, 2011. 
  6. ^ Wong, C.; Kiew, R.; Argent, G.; Set, O.; Lee, S.K. & Gan, Y.Y. (2002). "Assessment of the Validity of the Sections in Musa (Musaceae) using ALFP". Annals of Botany 90 (2): 231–238. doi:10.1093/aob/mcf170. 
  7. ^ a b Ploetz, R.C.; Kepler, A.K.; Daniells, J. & Nelson, S.C. (2007). "Banana and Plantain: An Overview with Emphasis on Pacific Island Cultivars". In Elevitch, C.R. Species Profiles for Pacific Island Agroforestry. Hōlualoa, Hawai'i: Permanent Agriculture Resources (PAR). Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  8. ^ Häkkinen, M.; Väre, H. & Christenhusz, M.J.M. (2012). "Identity of a Pisang – historical concepts of Musa (Musaceae) and the reinstatement of Musa troglodytarum". Folia malaysiana 13 (2): 1–14. 

External links[edit]

Pictures from PlantSystematics.Org