Museum of Computing

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Not to be confused with The National Museum of Computing, Bletchley Park.

Coordinates: 51°33′29″N 1°46′59″W / 51.558°N 1.783°W / 51.558; -1.783

Museumofcomputinglogo.jpg

The Museum of Computing in Swindon, England is dedicated to preserving and displaying examples of early computers.[1] It was the first United Kingdom museum exclusively dedicated to the history of computing and opened in February 2003.[2]

Aims[edit]

It aims to preserve the history of computing, to be used as a valuable educational resource and as an information repository for historians, collectors and the media, and to illustrate this history in an entertaining way.

Exhibits[edit]

The Museum includes working machines and interactive activities. The exhibitions have included the Pong to PlayStation exhibition.[3] More than thirty computers were lent to Gordon Laing, a former editor of Personal Computer World magazine, in connection with the writing of his 2004 book Digital Retro.[4]

Notable events[edit]

The exhibition "Calculators from the Abacus to the Microchip", was launched by Sir Clive Sinclair in March 2006.[5]

In April 2007, the Museum was honoured by a visit from HRH Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, patron of the British Computer Society.[6]

The Museum moved to 6–7 Theatre Square in July 2009, between the library and the theatre.[7][8]

In May 2010, the Museum celebrated the 30th anniversary of the video game Pac-Man with a real life Pac-Man game and special exhibition at the museum all day.[9]

March 2011, 'Gaming on the Go' exhibition, 35 years of the handheld games console.

Administration[edit]

The Museum of Computing is a not-for-profit organisation, run by a team of dedicated volunteers.

Sponsors[edit]

The Museum is sponsored by the following organisations

Supporters[edit]

The Museum is supported by the following organistaions

References[edit]

External links[edit]