Musgrave baronets

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There have been four baronetcies created for persons with the surname Musgrave, one in the Baronetage of England, one in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia, one in the Baronetage of Ireland and one in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. As of 2014 two of the creations are extant.

The Musgrave Baronetcy, of Hartley Castle in the County of Westmorland, was created in the Baronetage of England on 29 June 1611 for Richard Musgrave, Member of Parliament for Westmorland.[1] He was the member of a family that had been settled at Musgrave in Westmorland for many centuries and of which an earlier member, Thomas Musgrave, was summoned to the House of Lords as Baron Musgrave in 1350 (see this title for more information). The second Baronet represented Westmorland in the House of Commons and served with distinction as a Royalist in the Civil War. He was offered a peerage as Baron Musgrave, of Hartley Castle in the County of Westmorland, but did not take up the patent. The fourth Baronet sat as Member of Parliament for Carlisle, Westmorland, Appleby, Oxford University and Totnes. The fifth Baronet represented Carlisle and Cumberland in Parliament while the sixth Baronet represented Westmorland. The eighth Baronet sat as Member of Parliament for Petersfield and Carlisle and the eleventh Baronet sat for Cumberland East and served as Lord-Lieutenant of Westmorland.

The family seat was Hartley Castle, near Kirkby Stephen, Cumbria.

The Musgrave Baronetcy, of Hayton Castle in the County of Cumberland, was created in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia on 20 October 1638 for Edward Musgrave. The third Baronet represented Cumberland in the House of Commons. The title became extinct on the death of the tenth Baronet in 1875.

The Musgrave Baronetcy, of Tourin in the County of Waterford, was created in the Baronetage of Ireland on 2 December 1782 for Richard Musgrave, a member of the Irish House of Commons, with remainder in default of male issue of his own to his younger brothers and the heirs male of the body. On his death in 1818 he was succeeded according to the special remainder by his younger brother Christopher Frederick, the second Baronet. The third Baronet sat as Member of Parliament for County Waterford. The fourth Baronet served as Lord-Lieutenant of County Waterford.

The family seat was Tourin House, near Cappoquin, County Waterford.

The Musgrave Baronetcy, of Drumglass in the County of Antrim, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 4 March 1897 for the industrialist and philanthropist James Musgrave. The title became extinct on his death in 1904.

Musgrave baronets, of Hartley Castle (1611)[edit]

The heir presumptive is the present holder's only brother Julian Nigel Chardin Musgrave (born 1951).

Musgrave baronets, of Hayton Castle (1638)[edit]

Musgrave baronets, of Tourin (1782)[edit]

The heir presumptive is the present holder's only brother Michael Shane Musgrave (born 1968).

Musgrave baronets, of Drumglass (1897)[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

Baronetage of England
Preceded by
Wentworth baronets
Musgrave baronets
29 June 1611
Succeeded by
Seymour baronets