Musicforthemorningafter

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Musicforthemorningafter
Studio album by Pete Yorn
Released March 27, 2001
Genre Rock
Length 57:40 (original)
76:38 (expanded)
Label Columbia
Producer Pete Yorn, Brad Wood, R. Walt Vincent, Ken Andrews, and Don Fleming
Pete Yorn chronology
Musicforthemorningafter
(2001)
Live at the Roxy
(2001)

Musicforthemorningafter is the critically acclaimed and commercially successful debut album by Pete Yorn, released on March 27, 2001 through Columbia Records. It was certified RIAA GOLD in the United States and served as a launching pad for Yorn's career, which has spanned a decade so far.

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Pete Yorn.

  1. "Life on a Chain" – 3:45
  2. "Strange Condition" – 3:57
  3. "Just Another" – 3:14
  4. "Black" – 4:11
  5. "Lose You" – 4:35
  6. "For Nancy ('Cos It Already Is)" – 3:30
  7. "Murray" – 3:45
  8. "June" – 2:34
  9. "Sense" – 3:53
  10. "Closet" – 3:03
  11. "On Your Side" – 5:02
  12. "Sleep Better" – 4:28
  13. "EZ" – 4:41
  14. "Simonize" – 2:54
  15. "A Girl like You" – 2:21 [hidden track]
  16. "Knew Enough to Know Nothing at All" (bonus track from the Japanese import and Double-Vinyl album)

An expanded edition of musicforthemorningafter was released with a 5-track bonus CD:

  1. "New York City Serenade" – 7:17 (Bruce Springsteen cover)
  2. "Dancing in the Dark" – 4:26 (Bruce Springsteen cover)
  3. "Panic" – 3:14 (Smiths cover)
  4. "China Girl" – 3:46 (David Bowie cover)
  5. "Strange Condition [Rock Version]" – 3:51

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars [1]
Rolling Stone 4/5 stars [2]

The album was well received by critics. AllMusicGuide's MacKenzie Wilson wrote, "The year 2001 belonged to Yorn, and his critical praise was not unwarranted, with Musicforthemorningafter marking the stunning beginning of a long, varied career."

Rolling Stone included the album twice in their Critics' Top Albums of 2001. Steven Chean called it "Folk-rock that actually rocks." John D. Luerssen added, "I have seen the future of rock & roll and his name is . . ." [3]

In popular culture[edit]

References[edit]