My Elusive Dreams

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"My Elusive Dreams"
Single by David Houston and Tammy Wynette
from the album My Elusive Dreams
B-side "Marriage on the Rocks"
Released June 1967
Genre Country
Label Epic
Writer(s) Billy Sherrill
Curly Putman
Producer(s) Billy Sherrill
David Houston and Tammy Wynette singles chronology
"My Elusive Dreams"
(1967)
"It's All Over"
(1968)

"My Elusive Dreams" is a country music song written by Billy Sherrill and Curly Putman, which has been recorded by several artists. The best-known version was recorded as a duet by David Houston and Tammy Wynette, becoming a No. 1 hit in October 1967; the song also peaked at No. 89 on the Billboard Hot 100.[1]

The song follows a restless man and his wife, as he attempts to find an ever-elusive and lasting happiness pursuing various dreams and schemes, all which are ill-fated. The man's attempts at making something work include stops in at least six states (Texas, Utah, Alabama, Nebraska, Alaska, and Tennessee) and three U.S. cities: Birmingham, Memphis and Nashville. The man admits to his resigned wife that she's tired of following him around the country and that his dreams are fleeting.

Other versions[edit]

Putman's version of the song was released via ABC Records in July 1967, peaking at #41 on the Hot Country Singles charts and #34 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100.[2] Putman's version of the song made its chart debut on the chart dated for July 8, 1967, one week before the Houston-Wynette version.

A third version, recorded by Johnny Darrell, debuted on the country music charts dated for July 22, 1967, released through United Artists Records. This version spent three weeks on the charts and peaked at #73.[3]

Roger Miller recorded a cover in 1968, and in 1970, Bobby Vinton took his version of "My Elusive Dreams" which was also the title to his album of the same name to #27 on the country charts and #46 on the pop charts. Andy Williams released a version in 1974 on his album, You Lay So Easy on My Mind. In 1975, Charlie Rich took the song again onto the country and pop charts this time taking it to #3 on the country charts and #49 on the pop charts.

Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood recorded one version, and so did The Everly Brothers.

Chart performance[edit]

Curly Putman[edit]

Chart (1967) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 41
U.S. Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100 34

David Houston and Tammy Wynette[edit]

Chart (1967) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 1
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 89

Johnny Darrell[edit]

Chart (1967) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 73

Bobby Vinton[edit]

Chart (1970) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 27
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 46
U.S. Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks 7

Charlie Rich[edit]

Chart (1975) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 3
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 49
U.S. Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks 16
Canadian RPM Country Tracks 5
Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary Tracks 15

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 478. ISBN 0-89820-177-2. 
  2. ^ Whitburn, p. 478
  3. ^ Whitburn, p. 115

External links[edit]

Preceded by
"Your Tender Loving Care"
by Buck Owens
Billboard Hot Country Singles
number-one single

September 16-September 23, 1967
Succeeded by
"Laura (What's He Got That I Ain't Got)"
by Leon Ashley