Myjava

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Coordinates: 48°44′57″N 17°33′52″E / 48.74917°N 17.56444°E / 48.74917; 17.56444
Myjava
Town
Myjavacentrum.jpg
Country Slovakia
Region Trenčín
District Myjava
Tourism region Stredné Považie
River Myjava
Elevation 325 m (1,066 ft)
Coordinates 48°44′57″N 17°33′52″E / 48.74917°N 17.56444°E / 48.74917; 17.56444
Area 48.54 km2 (18.74 sq mi)
Population 12,811 (2005)
Density 264 / km2 (684 / sq mi)
Founded 1586
Mayor Pavol Halabrín (HZDS, SMER, ANO)
Timezone CET (UTC+1)
 - summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal code 907 01
Area code +421-34
Car plate MY
Location of Myjava in Slovakia
Location of Myjava in Slovakia
Location of Myjava in the Trenčín Region
Location of Myjava in the Trenčín Region
Statistics: MOŠ/MIS
Website: www.myjava.sk

Myjava (historically also Miava, German: Miawa, Hungarian: Miava) is a town in Trenčín Region, Slovakia.

Geography[edit]

It is located in the Myjava Hills at the foothills of the White Carpathians and nearby the Little Carpathians. The river Myjava flows through the town. It is 10 km (6.21 mi) away from the Czech border, 35 km (21.75 mi) from Skalica and 100 km (62.14 mi) from Bratislava.

History[edit]

The settlement was established in 1533 and was colonized by two groups of inhabitants: refugees fleeing from the Ottomans in southern Upper Hungary (present Slovakia) and inhabitants from north-western and northern Upper Hungary. During the Revolutions of 1848, the first Slovak National Council met in the town as a result of the Slovak Uprising. Today, the house of their meeting is now part of the Museum of the Slovak National Councils, a part of the Slovak National Museum network.

Demographics[edit]

According to the 2001 census, the town had 13,142 inhabitants. 95.5% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 1.5% Czechs and 0.4% Roma.[1] The religious makeup was 51.4% Lutherans, 28.2% people with no religious affiliation and 14.2% Roman Catholics.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Municipal Statistics". Statistical Office of the Slovak republic. Retrieved 2007-11-06. 

External links[edit]