Mystical realism

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In philosophy, mystical realism is a view concerning the nature of the divine. The philosophical use of the term originated with the Russian philosopher Nikolai Alexandrovich Berdyaev in his published article, titled "Decadentism and Mystical Realism".[1]

It has two components: a metaphysical and an epistemological. The metaphysical component rests on a distinction between the concepts "real" and "exist". Something exists if it:

  1. occupies space;
  2. has matter;
  3. is in time;
  4. is affected by causation.

Mystical realism holds that divine entities are not accurately described in terms of space, matter, time, or causation, and so they, despite being real by the philosophy, do not exist.

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