Mythic fiction

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Mythic fiction is literature that is rooted in, inspired by, or that in some way draws from the tropes, themes and symbolism of myth, folklore, and fairy tales.[1] The term is widely credited to Charles de Lint and Terri Windling.[2] Mythic fiction overlaps with urban fantasy and the terms are sometimes used interchangeably, but mythic fiction also includes contemporary works in non-urban settings. Mythic fiction refers to works of contemporary literature that often cross the divide between literary and fantasy fiction.[3]

Windling promoted mythic fiction as the co-editor (with Ellen Datlow) of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror annual volumes for sixteen years, and as the editor of the Endicott Studio Journal of Mythic Arts.

Though mythic fiction can be loosely based in mythology, it frequently uses familiar mythological personages archetypes (such as tricksters, or the thunderer). This is in contrast to other forms of fantasy, such as the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, which invent their own legends and folklore or volunteer entirely new pantheons.

A suggested Mythic fiction reading list can be found at the Endicott Studio website Mythic fiction Reading List.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "A Mythic Fiction Reading List, The Journal of Mythic Arts, online archive: http://endicottstudio.typepad.com/jomareadinglists/2007/10/a-mythic-fictio.html
  2. ^ Julie Bartel, The Continuum Encyclopedia of Young Adult Literature, "Mythic Fiction for Yong Adults," The Continuum International Publishing Group, Inc., 2005.
  3. ^ Julie Bartel, The Continuum Encyclopedia of Young Adult Literature, "Mythic Fiction for Yong Adults," The Continuum International Publishing Group, Inc., 2005.

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