N-Prize

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The N-Prize (the "N" stands for "Nanosatellite" or "Negligible Resources".[1]) is an inducement prize contest intended to "encourage creativity, originality and inventiveness in the face of severe odds and impossible financial restrictions"[2] and thus stimulate innovation directed towards obtaining cheap access to space. The competition was launched in 2008[3] by Cambridge biologist Paul H. Dear,[4] and is intended specifically to spur amateur involvement in spaceflight as it is "aimed at amateurs, enthusiasts, would-be boffins and foolhardy optimists."[5]

The challenge posed by the N-Prize is to launch a satellite weighing between 9.99 and 19.99 grams into Earth orbit, and to track it for a minimum of nine orbits. Most importantly, though, the launch budget must be within £999.99 (about $1500) - and must include the launch vehicle, all of the required non-reusable launch equipment hardware, and propellant.[5]

In order to be eligible for the awards the challenge initially had to be completed before 19:19:09 (GMT) on 19 September 2013, however later it was decided that the prize will remain open until won.[6] Doing so will earn the winning team a prize of £9,999.99.[7]

List of competing teams[edit]

The official site of the N-Prize includes an animated page listing over fifty teams together with contact information and links to any team websites.[8] Examples of teams[9] that have entered the competition at one time or another and who also have or had web pages include:

  • Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Cambridge University Spaceflight[18][19]
  • Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Potent Voyager[20]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Whimsical 'N-prize' to spur ultra-cheap space launches". New Scientist. 2008-04-21. Retrieved 2014-03-21. 
  2. ^ "Rules in full". N-Prize. §1. The Spirit of the N-Prize Challenge. Retrieved 2014-03-21. intended to encourage creativity, originality and inventiveness in the face of severe odds and impossible financial restrictions. 
  3. ^ "Halfbakery: N-Prize". 2008-02-13. Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  4. ^ "Paul H. Dear - Aerospace". Paul H. Dear. Retrieved 2014-03-21. 
  5. ^ a b ""Nines" have it for Nanosatellite space race: The N-Prize". ITWire. 2008-05-03. Retrieved 2014-03-21. 
  6. ^ "N-Prize reopened". N-Prize. Retrieved 2014-03-21. 
  7. ^ "N-Prize Founder, Dr. Paul Dear Talks to the Space Fellowship about Starting up a Space Prize (with a Bottle of Pinot Grigio)". 2008-06-16. Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  8. ^ "N-Prize teams". N-Prize. Retrieved 2014-03-21. 
  9. ^ "N-Prize: Team profiles". 2009-10-22. Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  10. ^ "Nebula Aerospace login page". Retrieved 2014-03-21. 
  11. ^ "UK Team "Nebula" Talk to the Space Fellowship about Entering the N-Prize". Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  12. ^ "Epsilon Vee's weblog". 2008-06-11. Retrieved 2014-03-21. 
  13. ^ "A Q&A session with N-Prize contenders "Epsilon Vee"". Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  14. ^ "South African Rocketry Association". Retrieved 2014-03-21. 
  15. ^ "South African Rocketry Association Projects". Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  16. ^ "Microlaunchers". Retrieved 2014-03-21. 
  17. ^ "Microlaunchers N-Prize Presentation". 2009-04-02. Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  18. ^ "Cambridge University Spaceflight - A student society aiming to get a rocket into space for less than £1000 per launch". Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  19. ^ "To the edge of space for £1,000". the Guardian. 2006-09-16. Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  20. ^ "Potent Voyager". 2008-08-08. Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  21. ^ "Team Prometheus - Advocates of the New Space Frontier". Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  22. ^ "Team Prometheus - Upcoming Tests, The N-Prize and the GLXP". 2010-01-11. Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  23. ^ "Team 9.99 // N-Prize Competitors". Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  24. ^ "Team Indians - Aerospace/Defense". Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  25. ^ "Kiwi2Space - New Zealand Back yard space pioneers". Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  26. ^ "Qi Spacecraft". Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  27. ^ "New N-Prize Team - Qi Spacecraft". 2008-11-24. Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  28. ^ "Aerosplice". Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  29. ^ "New N-Prize Team - Aerosplice". 2009-02-18. Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  30. ^ "Wikisat - Opening space to everyone". Retrieved 2014-03-22. 
  31. ^ "Una lanzadera 'low cost' para satélites enanos". el Mundo. 2012-11-01. Retrieved 2014-03-22. 

External links[edit]