N17 road (South Africa)

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National route N17 shield

National route N17
Route information
Maintained by SANRAL
Major junctions
West end: Wemmer Pan Road in Johannesburg
  N1 in Soweto
N3 in Alberton
N12 in Alberton
N2 / N11 in Ermelo
East end: MR3 at the Swaziland border near Ngwenya
Location
Major cities: Johannesburg, Germiston, Springs, Bethal, Ermelo
Highway system

Numbered routes of South Africa

N14 N18

The N17 is a national route in South Africa which runs from Johannesburg to Oshoek (Ngwenya) on the border with Swaziland. It passes through Springs, Bethal and Ermelo.[1]

The section of the N17 from Johannesburg to Springs is a dual carriageway and is a national toll route. It was the first urban toll road in Gauteng. It runs from the M11 Wemmer Pan Road in Johannesburg to Tonk Meter Road in Springs. The first part of the N17 used to be the old R77 which ran from the M46 Rand Airport Road to the R23. As part of the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Scheme, two slip roads have been made linking the N17 to the N12. It is now possible to travel from the N17 West to the N12 West and from the N12 East to the N17 East, both at the Elands Interchange (previously only possible via the N3). From Tonk Meter Road the N17 is a single carriageway freeway. The section from Springs to Leandra, ending at the interchange with the R50, was constructed by the then Transvaal Provincial Administration (TPA) in 1990 as a single carriageway road. (The R29 ran alongside the N17 from Springs to Leandra).

From Leandra, the N17 then followed the alignment of the R29 to Ermelo, and thereafter the R65 to Oshoek. However, the N17 at that time traversed through four towns (Leandra, Kinross, Trichardt and Bethal) causing delays to the traveling public, and safety risks to the local public, especially pedestrians. The R29 was also badly potholed, and without passing lanes or even shoulders, making the section from Leandra to Ermelo dangerous.

SANRAL commenced with toll feasibility investigations in 2001 for the N17 after which consultants were appointed for the rehabilitation, upgrading as well as design of new sections for the N17 from Springs to Ermelo. In order to enable SANRAL to refund loans for the funding of the rehabilitation project, it was inevitable that the N17 from Springs to Oshoek in the Mpumalanga Province would also be declared a continuous toll road and toll plazas will be erected.

The existing single lane carriageway between Springs and Leandra has been rehabilitated with improvements to the vertical and horizontal alignment, paved shoulders, grade separated interchanges at the R548 (Devon/Balfour) and R42 (Delmas/Nigel), and climbing/passing lanes. The new section between Leandra and Trichardt (21 km) has been completed, and the first toll plaza at the interchange with the R50 is now open. As of October 2011, the N17 rejoins the old alignment just east of Kinross. Other improvements will include a new section past Trichardt (3 km) and in Bethal (1,5 km).

The N17 East Toll Road comprises Section 2, 3, 4 and 5 of the proclaimed N17 route. In general terms the route can be described as the existing N17 between Springs and Oshoek, with approximately 26 km of newly constructed sections. The total length of the route is 290 km.

It is often forgotten that the N17 is intended to continue west of its present terminus with the M11 at Wemmer Pan Road to Krugersdorp. this would make it the much needed second link between the East and West Rand (presently the link is via the N12/N3/M2 and Main Reef Road R41). As part of the infrastructure built for the Soccer World Cup in 2010, a small portion of the N17, Section 1 has been built, including an interchange with the N1. However the N17 remains a dual carriageway road, and not freeway for this section. It runs for approximately 8km between the M5 Baragwanath Road and then sharply veers off its alignment to end at the northern end of Klipsruit Road. There are no plans to build the remainder of the N17.

Improvements in detail[edit]

Improvements to the section between Springs and Leandra (48km)[edit]

SANRAL constructed interchanges at the Nigel and Devon intersections to address high accident rates. In addition, passing and climbing lanes were constructed.

New section between Leandra and Leven Station (21km)[edit]

This is a completely new section. The section was constructed as a limited access road with interchanges. Initially, only one carriageway of a future dual carriageway has been constructed. The section will have paved shoulders and passing and climbing lanes. A mainline toll plaza will be constructed on this section.

Improvements to the section between Leven Station and Trichardt (12km)[edit]

The pavement will be rehabilitated as it has reached the end of its design life. The addition of paved shoulders as well as passing and climbing lanes. A ringroad section will be constructed around Trichardt (3 km). Grade separated intersections will be provided at high volume intersections.

Section between Trichardt and Bethal (30km)[edit]

The pavement will be rehabilitated as it has reached the end of its design life. The addition of paved shoulders as well as passing and climbing lanes. The construction of a link road to eliminate the staggered route alignment through Bethal (1,5 km). The provision of grade separated intersections at high volume intersections. A mainline toll plaza will be constructed on this section.

Section between Bethal and Ermelo (50km)[edit]

The pavement will be rehabilitated as it has reached the end of its design life. The improvement of the vertical and horizontal road alignment. The addition of paved shoulders as well as passing and climbing lanes. Consolidation of accesses and improvement of intersections. A mainline toll plaza will be constructed on this section.

Section between Ermelo and Oshoek (130km)[edit]

Initially, this section will be properly maintained as part of the toll project. Thereafter, the following actions will follow:

Periodic maintenance actions;

Minor improvements of the vertical and horizontal road alignment;

The addition of a narrow paved shoulders as well as passing and climbing lanes; consolidation of accesses and improvement of intersections;

References[edit]

  1. ^ Falkner, John (May 2012). South African Numbered Route Description and Destination Analysis (Report). National Department of Transport. pp. 33–34. http://www.transport.gov.za/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=5qOHvOI4KuY%3d. Retrieved 12 August 2014.

External links[edit]