Association of Public and Land-grant Universities

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Association of Public and Land-grant Universities
Abbreviation APLU
Formation October 1887
Legal status Active
Headquarters Washington, D.C.
Membership 236 Colleges, Universities and Higher Education Organizations
President M. Peter McPherson
Staff 50
Website Association of Public and Land-grant Universities
Formerly called National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC)

The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) is a research, policy, and advocacy organization of public research universities, land-grant institutions, state university systems, and higher education organizations. It has member campuses in all of the United States as well as the District of Columbia, four U.S. territories, Canada, and Mexico.

Membership[edit]

The association’s membership includes 236 institutions, consisting of 206 campuses (75 of which are land-grant institutions), 24 university systems, and six higher education affiliates. APLU member campuses enroll 4.7 million undergraduates and 1.3 million graduate students, award 1.1 million degrees, employ 1.3 million faculty and staff, and conduct $41 billion in university-based research.[1]

The association’s membership includes 23 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), of which 21 are land-grant institutions (two under the 1862 Morrill Act; 19 under the 1890 Morrill Act). The organization also represents 13 international universities from Canada and Mexico, and the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), which serves the interests of the nation’s 33 American Indian land-grant colleges.

Membership Involvement[edit]

APLU draws on the strengths and talents of its membership by providing opportunities to serve on a series of Councils and Commissions. APLU Councils are composed of university administrators with similar job functions who come together to address critical issues and expand their knowledge base within their professional area of expertise.[2] APLU Commissions cut across job function to enable individuals from multiple disciplines across universities to address critical issues and expand their knowledge base in areas of common interest.[3]

Both Councils and Commissions work collectively to develop initiatives and programs that help advance public universities and their missions through meetings and events held throughout the year.

Membership Criteria[edit]

Membership in APLU is automatically granted to land-grant institutions per the Morrill Land-Grant Acts of 1862,1890 and 1994.[4] Public universities classified as Research (Very High) or Research (High) in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Instructional Programs are also eligible for membership in the association.[4] APLU universities share a commitment to excellence in undergraduate and graduate education as well as innovation and discovery through research and community engagement at the local, national, and global levels. Public universities with similar commitments are encouraged to explore APLU’s membership criteria for more details.[5]

Key Areas of Focus[edit]

APLU undertakes a broad array of initiatives and projects aimed at strengthening public universities by proactively tackling some of the most complex issues confronting public higher education today. APLU’s complete summary of recent efforts can be found in the 2013 Annual Report.

  • Access & Diversity
  • Accountability & Degree Completion
  • Agriculture, Human Sciences, & Natural Resources
  • College Costs, Tuition, & Financial Aid
  • Economic Development
  • International Programs
  • Learning Technologies
  • Research, Science, & Technology
  • STEM Education
  • Teaching & Online Learning
  • Urban Initiatives

History[edit]

The roots of APLU were established in October 1887 as the American Association of Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations, making it North America's oldest higher education association.[6] The first annual convention was held that year in Washington, D.C. at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Pennsylvania State University President George W. Atherton was elected president of the Board of Directors.[7] Through the years, APLU has undergone a number of name changes to reflect its growing public higher education mission. In 1919, the Land-Grant Colleges Engineering Association merged with the association.[8] A few years later in 1926, the organization changed its name to the Association of Land-Grant Colleges and Universities.[8] In 1963, the American Association of Land-Grant Colleges and Universities merged with the National Association of State Universities to form the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC).[8] On March 30, 2009, the association adopted its current name—Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.[9]

Former Names of the Association Years Active
American Association of Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations 1887-1926
Association of Land-Grant Colleges and Universities 1926 - 1954
American Association of Land-grant Colleges and State Universities 1954-1963
National Association of State Universities and Land-grant Colleges (NASULGC) 1963-2009
Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) 2009–present

Organizational Structure[edit]

Association Leadership[edit]

In 2005, M. Peter McPherson became the third president (and fifth leader) of the association.

Former Association Leaders:

Name Title Years Served
Russell I. Thackery Executive Secretary 1945-1969
Ralph K. Huitt Executive Director 1969-1979
Robert L. Clodius President 1979-1992
C. Peter Magrath President 1992-2005
M. Peter McPherson President 2005-current

Board of Directors[edit]

The 26-member Board of Directors is the governing body of the association.[10]

2014 Executive Committee

Annual Meeting[edit]

The APLU Annual Meeting has become one of the world’s leading events for public university leaders to meet, exchange ideas with colleagues and develop new initiatives. The meeting’s diverse attendees include university presidents and chancellors, provosts, deans, and senior leaders for research, governmental affairs, public affairs, student affairs, finance and more.[11] This year's Annual Meeting takes place in Orlando, FL November 2–4, 2014.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ What is APLU? http://www.aplu.org/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?pid=183&srcid=203
  2. ^ "APLU Councils". 
  3. ^ "APLU Commissions". 
  4. ^ a b "Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU) Membership Criteria". APLU. June 15, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Benefits of APLU Membership". 
  6. ^ Office of Experiment Stations Proceedings A.A.C.E.S Warington's Lectures. Washington, DC: U.S Department of Agriculture. March 1889. 
  7. ^ Office of Experiment Stations Proceedings A.A.C.E.S. Warington's Lectures. Washington, DC: U.S Department of Agriculture. March 1889. 
  8. ^ a b c The Land-Grant Tradition. Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. 2012. 
  9. ^ Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) Name Rolls Out Monday http://www.aplu.org/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?pid=1202&srcid=273
  10. ^ "APLU Board of Directors". 
  11. ^ "APLU Annual Meeting". 
  12. ^ "APLU Annual Meeting". www.aplu.org/annualmeeting. 

External links[edit]