NBR J class

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NBR J Class
LNER Classes D29 & D30
Specifications
Power type Steam
Designer William P. Reid
Builder North British Locomotive Company
and
NBR Cowlairs Works
Build date 1909-1920
Configuration 4-4-0
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Leading wheel
diameter
3 ft 6 in (1.07 m)
Driver diameter 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Length 46 ft 8.5 in (14.24 m)
Axle load 18.4 long tons (18.7 t)
Locomotive weight

54.8 long tons (55.7 t) D29,
57.3 long tons (58.2 t) D30/1,

57.8 long tons (58.7 t) D30/2
Tender weight 46.0 long tons (46.7 t)
Fuel type coal
Boiler 5 ft 0 in (1.52 m) diameter
Boiler pressure 190 psi (1.3 MPa) D29,
165 psi (1.14 MPa) D30
Firegrate area 21.13 square feet (1.963 m2)
Heating surface:
– Tubes
1,478.3 square feet (137.34 m2) D29,
871.3 square feet (80.95 m2) D30/1
677.0 square feet (62.90 m2) D30/2
– Firebox 139.7 square feet (12.98 m2)
Cylinders 2
Cylinder size 19 in × 26 in (480 mm × 660 mm) D29, 20 in × 26 in (510 mm × 660 mm) D30
Valve gear Stephenson
Tractive effort 19,434 lbf (86.45 kN) D29
18,700 lbf (83 kN) D30
Career
Power class BR: 3P
Number 243-245, 338-340, 359-363, 400, 409-428, 497-501, 895-899, 990
Retired 1960

The NBR J Class (LNER Classes D29 & D30), were a class of 4-4-0 steam tender locomotives designed by William P. Reid for the North British Railway. They passed to the London and North Eastern Railway at the grouping in 1923. Ten D29s and 25 D30s survived into British Railways ownership in 1948.

Overview[edit]

The Original J Class locomotives were based on the NBR K Class mixed traffic 4-4-0s. The J Class had 6' 6" driving wheels for express passenger work and a large tender which carried sufficient water to allow passenger trains to run non-stop between Edinburgh and Carlisle. These locomotives were named after characters in the novels of Sir Walter Scott and naturally became known as "Scotts". Some of the names were later re-used on LNER Peppercorn Class A1 locomotives.

Builders[edit]

Six locomotives were built in 1909 by the North British Locomotive Company and a further ten were built in 1911 by the North British Railway at its Cowlairs railway works, followed by two further identical locomotives with superheaters.[1] The NBR always referred to these locomotives as J Class, but the LNER classified the initial 16 locomotives D29, and the two superheated locomotives as D30.[2] A further 25 superheated locomotives were built between 1914 and 1920 and the LNER classified these as D30/2.[3]

Accidents and incidents[edit]

  • On 3 January 1917, locomotive No. 421 Jingling Geordie overran signals and was in a head-on collision with an express passenger train at Ratho, Lothian. Twelve people were killed and 44 were seriously injured. Irregular operating procedures were a major contributory factor in the accident. These were subsequently stopped.[4]

Numbers and names[edit]

British Railways numbers [5] were:

  • D29, 62401-62413 (with gaps)
  • D30, 62417-62442 (62433 missing)
Built Class NBR no. Name LNER 1st no. LNER 2nd no. BR no. Withdrawn
1909 D29 895 Rob Roy 9895 2400 (62400) 1948
1909 D29 896 Dandie Dinmont 9896 2401 (62401) 1949
1909 D29 897 Redgauntlet 9897 2402 (62402) 1949
1909 D29 898 Sir Walter Scott 9898 2403 (62403) 1948
1909 D29 899 Jeanie Deans 9899 2404 (62404) 1949
1909 D29 900 The Fair Maid 9900 2405 62405 1951
1911 D29 243 Meg Merrilies 9243 2406 (62406) 1949
1911 D29 244 Madge Wildfire 9244 2407 1947
1911 D29 245 Bailie Nicol Jarvie 9245 2408 1947
1911 D29 338 Helen MacGregor 9338 2409 (62409) 1948
1911 D29 339 Ivanhoe 9339 2410 62410 1952
1911 D29 340 Lady of Avenel 9340 2411 62411 1952
1911 D29 359 Dirk Hatteraick 9359 2412 62412 1950
1911 D29 360 Guy Mannering 9360 2413 62413 1950
1911 D29 361 Vich Ian Vohr 9361 (2414) 1946
1911 D29 362 Ravenswood 9362 2415 1947
1912 D30/1 400 The Dougal Cratur 9400 (2416) 1945
1912 D30/1 363 Hal o' the Wynd 9363 2417 62417 1951
1914 D30/2 409 The Pirate 9409 2418 62418 1959
1914 D30/2 410 Meg Dods 9410 2419 62419 1957
1914 D30/2 411 Dominie Sampson 9411 2420 62420 1957
1914 D30/2 412 Laird o' Monkbarns 9412 2421 62421 1960
1914 D30/2 413 Caleb Balderstone 9413 2422 62422 1958
1914 D30/2 414 Dugald Dalgetty 9414 2423 62423 1957
1914 D30/2 415 Claverhouse 9415 2424 62424 1957
1914 D30/2 416 Ellangowan 9416 2425 62425 1958
1914 D30/2 417 Cuddie Headrigg 9417 2426 62426 1960
1914 D30/2 418 Dumbiedykes 9418 2427 62427 1959
1914 D30/2 419 The Talisman 9419 2428 62428 1958
1914 D30/2 420 The Abbot 9420 2429 62429 1957
1914 D30/2 421 Jingling Geordie 9421 2430 62430 1957
1914 D30/2 422 Kenilworth 9422 2431 62431 1958
1914 D30/2 423 Quentin Durward 9423 2432 62432 1958
1915 D30/2 424 Lady Rowena 9424 2433 1947
1915 D30/2 425 Kettledrummle 9425 2434 62434 1958
1915 D30/2 426 Norna 9426 2435 62435 1957
1915 D30/2 427 Lord Glenvarloch 9427 2436 62436 1959
1915 D30/2 428 Adam Woodcock 9428 2437 62437 1958
1920 D30/2 497 Peter Poundtext 9497 2438 62438 1957
1920 D30/2 498 Father Ambrose 9498 2439 62439 1959
1920 D30/2 499 Wandering Willie 9499 2440 62440 1958
1920 D30/2 500 Black Duncan 9500 2441 62441 1958
1920 D30/2 501 Simon Glover 9501 2442 62442 1958

NBR no. 898 was named after the author of the Waverley Novels, and the others were given the names either of those novels, or of characters and places in them. The LNER increased the NBR numbers by 9000, and these were applied between 1924 and 1926. New LNER numbers were allotted in 1943 in the order of construction, but the locos were not renumbered until 1946, by which time two had been withdrawn. British Railways increased the LNER 1946 numbers by 60000 between 1948 and 1950, but some were withdrawn before this could be carried out. Numbers in parentheses were allocated but not carried.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marsden, Richard. "The Reid D29 'Scott' (NBR Class J) 4-4-0 Locomotives". The LNER Encyclopedia. Winwaed Software Technology LLC. Retrieved 2008-11-20. 
  2. ^ Marsden, Richard. "The Reid D30 'Superheated Scott' (NBR Class J) 4-4-0 Locomotives". The LNER Encyclopedia. Winwaed Software Technology LLC. Retrieved 2008-11-20. 
  3. ^ http://www.lner.info/locos/D/d30.shtml
  4. ^ Earnshaw, Alan (1991). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 7. Penryn: Atlantic Books. pp. 18–19. ISBN 0-906899-50-8. 
  5. ^ Ian Allan ABC of British Railways Locomotives, 1948 edition, part 4, pp 19-20
  6. ^ Boddy, M.G.; Brown, W.A.; Fry, E.V.; Hennigan, W.; Manners, F.; Neve, E.; Tee, D.F.; Yeadon, W.B. (April 1968). Fry, E.V., ed. Locomotives of the L.N.E.R., part 4: Tender Engines - Classes D25 to E7. Kenilworth: RCTS. pp. 18, 21, 22, 24, 26, 27–28. ISBN 0-901115-01-0.