NCAA Football 2005

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NCAA Football 2005
NCAA Football 2005
PlayStation 2 cover art
Pictured: Larry Fitzgerald
Developer(s) EA Tiburon
Publisher(s) EA Sports
Platform(s) PlayStation 2, Xbox, GameCube
Release date(s)
  • NA July 15, 2004
Genre(s) Traditional football simulation
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer, online multiplayer

NCAA Football 2005 is an American college football video game which was released on July 15, 2004. It is the successor to NCAA Football 2004 in the NCAA Football series. The product features former Pittsburgh Panthers and current Arizona Cardinals standout wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald on the cover. The game is the NCAA Football series released by EA Sports. This would be the final game in the NCAA Football series to be released to the Nintendo Gamecube.

Gameplay[edit]

Home-field advantage[edit]

The main focus of NCAA Football 2005 is home-field advantage. While playing at home is an advantage in any sport, amateur or professional (especially in the playoffs), some say the concept of home-field advantage matters most in college football. Hence, the major addition to the 2005 game is the "Top 25 Toughest Places to Play," compiled by EA Sports. These rankings are based on home winning percentage, average attendance, and "atmosphere" (i.e., fan rowdiness and noise).

Players with the home field advantage on defense can increase the crowd's volume before the snap by repeatedly pressing a certain button on the controller, depending on the system. Likewise, the player with the home field advantage on offense can quiet the crowd with one press of the same button. Crowd noise may affect the quarterback's ability to get an audible across to his other players. If the noise is sufficient, when the quarterback tries to call an audible, one of his teammates will come down to him and gesture that he can't understand him.

Reception[edit]

While most reviews have been positive, many felt that NCAA 2005 made little changes from last year's game. Players also noticed that receivers dropped passes considerably more than NCAA Football 2004.[citation needed]

External links[edit]