NCAA Men's Division III Basketball Championship

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NCAA Men's Division III Basketball Championship
NCAA logo.svg
Sport Basketball
Founded 1975
No. of teams 61
Country NCAA Division III (USA)
Most recent champion(s) Wisconsin–Whitewater (4)
Official website NCAA.com

The NCAA holds an annual tournament to determine the Division III Men's Basketball Championship.

Since 1996, the Division III men's basketball championship has been held at the Salem Civic Center in Salem, Virginia. The event has been hosted by the Old Dominion Athletic Conference and the City of Salem. Today, the tournament is a 61-team single-elimination tournament, with teams advancing from four regionals to the semifinals and final in Salem.

For 2013, as part of the celebration of the 75th Division I tournament, the championship games in both the Division II and Division III tournaments were played at Philips Arena in Atlanta.[1] For 2014, the final game returned to Salem.[2]

Summary[edit]

NCAA Men's Division III Basketball Championship
Year Finals Site Championship Game Semifinalists Tournament MOP
(University)
Winner Score Runner-up
1975
Details
Reading, PA LeMoyne–Owen 57–54 Glassboro State Augustana (IL)
Brockport
Bob Newman
(LeMoyne–Owen)
1976
Details
Scranton 60–57
(OT)
Potsdam State Augustana (IL)
Plattsburgh State
Jack Maher
(Scranton)
1977
Details
Rock Island, IL Wittenberg 79–66 Oneonta State Scranton
Hamline
Rick White
(Wittenberg)
1978
Details
North Park 69–57 Widener Albion
Stony Brook
Michael Harper
(North Park)
1979
Details
North Park (2) 66–62 Potsdam State Franklin & Marshall
Centre
Michael Harper
(North Park)
1980
Details
North Park (3) 83–76 Upsala Wittenberg
Longwood
Michael Thomas
(North Park)
1981
Details
Potsdam State 67–65
(OT)
Augustana (IL) Ursinus
Otterbein
Maxwell Artis
(Augustana–IL)
1982
Details
Grand Rapids, MI Wabash 83–62 Potsdam State Brooklyn
Cal State Stanislaus
Pete Metzelaars
(Wabash)
1983
Details
Scranton (2) 64–63 Wittenberg Roanoke
Wisconsin–Whitewater
Bill Bessoir
(Scranton)
1984
Details
Wisconsin–Whitewater 103–86 Clark (MA) DePauw
Upsala
Andre McKoy
(Wisconsin–Whitewater)
1985
Details
North Park (4) 72–71 Potsdam State Nebraska Wesleyan
Widener
Earnest Hubbard
(North Park)
1986
Details
Potsdam State (2) 76–73 LeMoyne–Owen Nebraska Wesleyan
New Jersey City
Roosevelt Bullock
(Potsdam State)
1987
Details
North Park (5) 106–100 Clark (MA) Wittenberg
Richard Stockton
Michael Starks
(North Park)
1988
Details
Ohio Wesleyan 92–70 Scranton Nebraska Wesleyan
Hartwick
Scott Tedder
(Ohio Wesleyan)
1989
Details
Springfield, OH Wisconsin–Whitewater (2) 94–86 Trenton State Southern Maine
Centre
Greg Grant
(Trenton State)
1990
Details
Rochester 43–42 DePauw Washington College
Calvin
Chris Fite
(Rochester)
1991
Details
Wisconsin–Platteville 81–74 Franklin & Marshall Otterbein
Ramapo
Shawn Frison
(Wisconsin–Platteville)
1992
Details
Calvin 62–49 Rochester Wisconsin–Platteville
New Jersey City
Steve Honderd
(Calvin)
1993
Details
Buffalo, NY Ohio Northern 71–68 Augustana (IL) Rowan
UMass–Dartmouth
Kirk Anderson
(Augustana–IL)
1994
Details
Lebanon Valley 66–59
(OT)
NYU Wittenberg
St. Thomas (MN)
Mike Rhoades/Adam Crawford
(Lebanon Valley/NYU)
1995
Details
Wisconsin–Platteville (2) 69–55 Manchester (IN) Rowan
Trinity (CT)
Ernie Peavy
(Wisconsin–Platteville)
1996
Details
Salem, VA Rowan 100–93 Hope Illinois Wesleyan
Franklin & Marshall
Terrence Stewart
(Rowan)
1997
Details
Illinois Wesleyan 89–86 Nebraska Wesleyan Williams
Alvernia
Bryan Crabtree
(Illinois Wesleyan)
1998
Details
Wisconsin–Platteville (3) 69–56 Hope Williams
Wilkes
Ben Hoffmann
(Wisconsin–Platteville)
1999
Details
Wisconsin–Platteville (4) 76–75
(2OT)
Hampden–Sydney Connecticut College
William Paterson
Merrill Brunson
(Wisconsin–Platteville)
2000
Details
Calvin (2) 79–74 Wisconsin–Eau Claire Salem State
Franklin & Marshall
Sherm Carstensen
(Calvin)
2001
Details
Catholic 76–62 William Paterson Illinois Wesleyan
Ohio Northern
Pat Maloney
(Catholic)
2002
Details
Otterbein 102–83 Elizabethtown Carthage
Rochester
Jeff Gibbs
(Otterbein)
2003
Details
Williams 67–65 Gustavus Adolphus Wooster
Hampden–Sydney
Benjamin Coffin
(Williams)
2004[3]
Details
Wisconsin–Stevens Point 84–82 Williams John Carroll
Amherst
Nick Bennett
(Wisconsin–Stevens Point)
2005
Details
Wisconsin–Stevens Point (2) 73–49 Rochester Calvin
York (PA)
Jason Kalsow
(Wisconsin–Stevens Point)
2006
Details
Virginia Wesleyan 59–56[4] Wittenberg Illinois Wesleyan
Amherst
Ton Ton Balenga
(Virginia Wesleyan)
2007
Details
Amherst 80–67[5] Virginia Wesleyan Washington–St. Louis
Wooster
Andrew Olson
(Amherst)
2008
Details
Washington–St. Louis 90–68 Amherst Hope
Ursinus
Troy Ruths
(Washington–St. Louis)
2009
Details
Washington–St. Louis (2) 61–52[6] Richard Stockton Guilford
Franklin & Marshall
Sean Wallis
(Washington–St. Louis)
2010
Details
Wisconsin–Stevens Point (3) 78–73[7] Williams Guilford
Randolph–Macon
Matt Moses
(Wisconsin–Stevens Point)
2011
Details
St. Thomas (MN) 78–54[8] Wooster Middlebury
Williams
Tyler Nicolai
(St. Thomas–MN)
2012
Details
Wisconsin–Whitewater (3) 63–60[9] Cabrini Illinois Wesleyan
MIT
Chris Davis
(Wisconsin–Whitewater)
2013
Details
Atlanta, GA Amherst (2) 87-70[10] Mary Hardin-Baylor St. Thomas (MN)
North Central (IL)
Allen Williamson
(Amherst)
2014
Details
Salem, VA Wisconsin–Whitewater (4) 75-73[11] Williams Amherst
Illinois Wesleyan
K.J. Evans
(Wisconsin–Whitewater)
2015
Details


Locations[edit]

Championships by Schools[edit]

School Titles Years
North Park 5 1978, 1979, 1980, 1985, 1987
Wisconsin-Whitewater 4 1984, 1989, 2012, 2014
Wisconsin-Platteville 4 1991, 1995, 1998, 1999
Wisconsin-Stevens Point 3 2004, 2005, 2010
Amherst 2 2007, 2013
Calvin 2 1992, 2000
Potsdam State 2 1981, 1986
Scranton 2 1976, 1983
Saint Thomas of Minnesota 1 2011
Virginia Wesleyan 1 2006
Williams 1 2003
Otterbein 1 2002
Catholic 1 2001
Illinois Wesleyan 1 1997
Rowan 1 1996
Lebanon Valley 1 1994
Ohio Northern 1 1993
Rochester 1 1990
Ohio Wesleyan 1 1988
Wabash 1 1982
Wittenberg 1 1977
LeMoyne-Owen 1 1975

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Success paves way for 75th celebration" (Press release). NCAA. May 10, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Preliminary round sites announced for 2014, 2015 NCAA tournaments". NCAA. December 16, 2012. Retrieved 24 January 2013. 
  3. ^ Kalsow comes through for Pointers - Men's College Basketball - ESPN
  4. ^ Balenga leads Virginia Wesleyan to title - Men's College Basketball - ESPN
  5. ^ Amherst notches first D-III basketball championship - Men's College Basketball - ESPN
  6. ^ Washington University repeats as Division-III champion - ESPN
  7. ^ Wisconsin-Stevens Point Pointers rally to beat Williams College for DIII title - ESPN
  8. ^ St. Thomas pounds Wooster for NCAA Division III men's title - ESPN
  9. ^ Wisconsin-Whitewater wins D-III men's hoops crown - ESPN
  10. ^ [1]
  11. ^ "It's a family tradition at Whitewater; KJ Evans earns MOP, follows in uncle's footsteps". NCAA. NCAA.com. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Division III Men’s Basketball Championship". NCAA. NCAA.org. p. 17. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 

External links[edit]