NCAA Men's National Collegiate Volleyball Championship

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NCAA Men's National Collegiate Volleyball Championship
NCAA logo.svg
Sport College indoor volleyball
Founded 1970
No. of teams 6 (as of 2014)
Country  United States
Most recent champion(s) Loyola (1)
TV partner(s) ESPNU
Official website NCAA.com

The NCAA Men's National Collegiate Volleyball Championship was, before 2012, the only tournament that determined the NCAA championship of American college men's volleyball. It remains the NCAA's top-level men's volleyball championship, following the 2012 establishment of a Division III championship.

Schools from the Pacific Coast region have dominated this sport, in particular UCLA. Al Scates, the coach at UCLA, has won more NCAA Titles (19) than any other coach. Pepperdine has the second most titles with 5

Competition structure[edit]

Before the 2011–12 school year (2012 championship), men's volleyball did not have an official divisional structure; even now, that structure is truncated. The National Collegiate Championship remains as the NCAA's top-level championship, but Division III members now have their own championship, officially known as the NCAA Men's Division III Volleyball Championship.

With the introduction of an official Division III championship, schools in that division are no longer eligible for the National Collegiate Championship. The last exception was Rutgers–Newark, whose men's volleyball program had been a grandfathered scholarship program, and could compete for the National Collegiate Championship through 2014. Rutgers–Newark completed a transition to Division III men's volleyball at the end of that season, and joined the D-III Continental Volleyball Conference effective with the 2015 season.

There are three general regions for men's volleyball: "West", "Mid-West", and "East". The three major conferences that currently represent these regions are the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF), Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (MIVA), and Eastern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (EIVA). After the creation of the D-III national championship, the only other conference whose members are eligible to compete for the National Collegiate Championship is Conference Carolinas, a Division II league. Members of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), a separate athletics governing body whose members are primarily smaller institutions, regularly play matches against NCAA teams.

Because of the historic lack of an official divisional structure in men's volleyball, two of the three major conferences (the MIVA and MPSF) have members that normally compete in Division II. Before the creation of the Division III national championship, the third (the EIVA) had several Division III members, but all of those schools now compete in D-III men's volleyball.

Through the 2013 tournament, each of the three major conferences (MPSF, MIVA and EIVA) received an automatic bid to the Final Four, with one additional at-large bid. The remaining bid was an at-large bid that could be awarded to any team in Division I or II (including Rutgers–Newark). Generally, the best team not receiving an automatic bid (usually from one of the three major conferences) received the at-large bid.

Beginning with the 2014 championship, the field expanded to six teams, with the two new teams being the champion of Conference Carolinas and one extra at-large entry. The new format features two quarterfinal matches involving the four lowest-seeded teams in the field, with the winners joining the two top seeds in the semifinals. Originally, the quarterfinals were to be played at campus sites, with the Final Four at a separate predetermined site, but it was decided instead to have the entire championship tournament at one site.

Division I participation[edit]

The number of D-I schools sponsoring men's volleyball has fluctuated between 20 and 24 teams since 1986.[1] None of the traditional D-I conferences sponsor volleyball. Two of the three major conferences, the Eastern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (EIVA) and Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (MIVA) are volleyball-specific conferences. The third major conference is the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF), a multi-sport conference that does not sponsor either football or basketball. In addition to the D-I schools, 22 schools from lower divisions will compete in D-I volleyball in the next men's volleyball season of 2015:

  • Four D-II schools will compete in the MIVA following the arrival of McKendree from the independent ranks.
  • Two D-II schools compete in the MPSF.
  • Ten D-II members will compete in the men's volleyball league sponsored by Conference Carolinas, the only all-sports conference outside of Division III that sponsors the sport. The league is expanding by two teams with the addition of Emmanuel (GA) (which already sponsors the sport) from the NAIA ranks and the launch of a men's volleyball program at North Greenville (a full conference member since 2011).
  • Six D-II members will compete as men's volleyball independents; four of them are campuses of the University of Puerto Rico. The other two are Charleston (WV), which will play its first men's volleyball season in 2015, and Holy Names, currently transitioning from the NAIA to D-II.

D-II does not have a separate national championship, and neither D-I nor D-II has a sufficient number of teams to sponsor a national championship without the other.

Champions[edit]

NCAA Men’s National Collegiate Volleyball Championship[2]
Year Site
(Host)
Host Arena Final Third Place Final / Other participants
Winner Score Runner-up Third Place Score Fourth Place
1970
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion UCLA (24–1) 3–0 Long Beach State UC Santa Barbara 2–0 Ball State
1971
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion UCLA (29–1) 3–2 UC Santa Barbara Ball State 2–0 Springfield
1972
Details
Muncie, IN
(Ball State)
Irving Gymnasium UCLA (27–7) 3–2 San Diego State Ball State 2–0 UC Santa Barbara
1973
Details
San Diego, CA
(San Diego State)
Peterson Gym San Diego State (21–5) 3–1 Long Beach State Ball State 2–0 Army
1974
Details
Santa Barbara, CA
(UCSB)
Robertson Gymnasium UCLA (30–5) 3–2 UC Santa Barbara Ball State 2–1 Springfield
1975
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion UCLA (27–8) 3–1 UC Santa Barbara Ohio State 2–0 Yale
1976
Details
Muncie, IN
(Ball State)
Irving Gymnasium UCLA (15–2) 3–0 Pepperdine Ohio State 2–0 Springfield
1977
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion USC (18–1) 3–1 Ohio State Pepperdine 2–0 Rutgers–Newark
1978
Details
Columbus, OH
(Ohio State)
St. John Arena Pepperdine (21–4) 3–2 UCLA Ohio State 2–0 Rutgers–Newark
1979
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion UCLA (30–0) 3–1 USC Rutgers–Newark 3–2 Ball State
1980
Details
Muncie, IN
(Ball State)
Irving Gymnasium USC (22–6) 3–1 UCLA Ohio State 3–0 Rutgers–Newark
1981
Details
Santa Barbara, CA
(UCSB)
UCSB Events Center UCLA (32–3) 3–2 USC Penn State 3–1 Ohio State
1982
Details
University Park, PA
(Penn State)
Rec Hall UCLA (29–0) 3–0 Penn State USC 2–1 Ohio State
1983
Details
Columbus, OH
(Ohio State)
St. John Arena UCLA (27–4) 3–0 Pepperdine Ohio State 3–1 Penn State
1984
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion UCLA (38–0) 3–1 Pepperdine George Mason 3–0 Ball State
1985
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion Pepperdine (25–2) 3–2 USC George Mason 3–0 Ball State
1986
Details
University Park, PA
(Penn State)
Rec Hall Pepperdine (22–7) 3–2 USC Penn State 3–0 Ohio State
1987
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion UCLA (28–3) 3–0 USC Penn State 3–0 Ohio State
1988
Details
Fort Wayne, IN
(IPFW)
ACWMC USC (34–4) 3–2 UC Santa Barbara Ball State 3–1 George Mason
1989
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion UCLA (29–5) 3–1 Stanford Penn State 3–0 Ball State
1990
Details
Fairfax, VA
(George Mason)
Patriot Center USC (26–7) 3–1 Long Beach State Ball State 3–1 Rutgers–Newark
1991
Details
Honolulu, HI
(Hawaiʻi)
Neal S. Blaisdell Center Long Beach State (31–4) 3–1 USC IPFW 3–1 Penn State
1992
Details
Muncie, IN
(Ball State)
John E. Worthen Arena Pepperdine (24–4) 3–0 Stanford Penn State 3–0 IPFW
1993
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion UCLA (24–3) 3–0 Cal State Northridge Penn State 3–2 Ohio State
1994
Details
Fort Wayne, IN
(IPFW)
ACWMC Penn State (26–3) 3–2 UCLA Ball State 3–0 IPFW
1995
Details
Springfield, MA
(Springfield)
Springfield Civic Center UCLA (31–1) 3–0 Penn State Ball State 3–1 Hawaiʻi
1996
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion UCLA (26–5) 3–2 Hawaiʻi Lewis and Penn State
1997
Details
Columbus, OH
(Ohio State)
St. John Arena Stanford (27–4) 3–2 UCLA Ball State and Penn State
1998
Details
Honolulu, HI
(Hawaiʻi)
Stan Sheriff Center UCLA (28–4) 3–0 Pepperdine Lewis and Princeton
1999
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion BYU (30–1) 3–0 Long Beach State IPFW and Penn State
2000
Details
Fort Wayne, IN
(IPFW)
ACWMC UCLA (29–5) 3–0 Ohio State Penn State and Pepperdine
2001
Details
Long Beach, CA
(Long Beach State)
The Walter Pyramid BYU (23–4) 3–0 UCLA Ohio State and Penn State
2002
Details
University Park, PA
(Penn State)
Rec Hall Hawaiʻi (24–8)† 3–1 Pepperdine Ball State and Penn State
2003
Details
Long Beach, CA
(Long Beach State)
The Walter Pyramid Lewis (29–6)† 3–2 BYU Penn State and Pepperdine
2004
Details
Honolulu, HI
(Hawaiʻi)
Stan Sheriff Center BYU (29–4) 3–2 Long Beach State Lewis and Penn State
2005
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion Pepperdine (25–2) 3–2 UCLA Ohio State and Penn State
2006
Details
University Park, PA
(Penn State)
Rec Hall UCLA (26–12) 3–0 Penn State UC Irvine and IPFW
2007
Details
Columbus, OH
(Ohio State)
St. John Arena UC Irvine (29–5) 3–1 IPFW Penn State and Pepperdine
2008
Details
Irvine, CA
(UC Irvine)
Bren Events Center Penn State (30–1) 3–1 Pepperdine Long Beach State and Ohio State
2009
Details
Provo, UT
(BYU)
Smith Fieldhouse UC Irvine (27–5) 3–2 USC (21–11) Ohio State and Penn State
2010
Details
Stanford, CA
(Stanford)
Maples Pavilion Stanford (24–6) 3–0 Penn State (24–8) Cal State Northridge and Ohio State
2011
Details
University Park, PA
(Penn State)
Rec Hall Ohio State (26–6) 3–2 UC Santa Barbara (18–15) Penn State and USC
2012
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(USC)
Galen Center UC Irvine (26–5) 3–0 USC (24–6) Lewis and Penn State
2013
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion UC Irvine (25–7)[3] 3–0 BYU (26–5) Loyola Chicago and Penn State
2014
Details
Chicago, IL
(Loyola Chicago)
Gentile Arena Loyola Chicago (29-1) 3-1 Stanford (24-9) BYU, Lewis, Penn State, Erskine
2015
Details
Stanford, CA
(Stanford)
Maples Pavilion
2016
Details
University Park, PA
(Penn State)
Rec Hall
2017
Details
Columbus, OH
(Ohio State)
St. John Arena
2018
Details
Los Angeles, CA
(UCLA)
Pauley Pavilion

†Vacated due to NCAA violations


NCAA Championships by University[edit]

The Pennsylvania State University Nittany Lions men's volleyball team are honored in June 2008 at the White House for President of the United States George W. Bush for the side's winning the 2008 national championship.
School # Last
UCLA 19 2006
Pepperdine 5 2005
Southern California 4 1990
UC Irvine 4 2013
BYU 3 2004
Penn State 2 2008
Stanford 2 2010
Loyola Chicago 1 2014
Ohio State 1 2011
Long Beach State 1 1991
San Diego State 1 1973

Past Tournaments[edit]

California-based universities dominate the men's volleyball national championship; Loyola Chicago, Penn State, Ohio State and BYU are the only non-California universities to have won the NCAA Div. I championship; Hawaiʻi and Lewis also won the championship tournament, but had their victories vacated due to NCAA rules violations. Only six non-California universities have participated in the NCAA Div. I championship match (Loyola, BYU, Penn State, Ohio State, IPFW, Hawaiʻi, and Lewis), although other universities such as Princeton and Ball State have participated in the final four. The only final to date that involved two non-California schools was in 2003, when Lewis defeated BYU but had its win vacated.

UCLA, Southern California, Penn State, Stanford, and Long Beach State are the only schools in Division I to have won an NCAA national championship in both men and women's volleyball. (But for Hawaiʻi's vacated 2002 title, it would have matched this feat with 3 NCAA and 1 AIAW women's national championships.) In addition, Stanford (1996–97) and Penn State (2007–08) are the only universities whose men and women's volleyball programs have won the national championship in the same academic year. The 2014 championship tournament took place from April 29 to May 3 at Gentile Arena on the campus of Loyola University Chicago.

2011[edit]

  • May 5, 2011 – UC Santa Barbara def. Southern California, 29-27, 24-26, 25-15, 25-18; Ohio State def. Penn St., 25-18, 24-26, 25-22, 25-23
  • May 7, 2011 – Ohio State def. UC Santa Barbara, 20-25, 25-20, 25-19, 22-25, 15-9
  Semi-Finals
Thursday, May 5, 2011
Rec Hall, University Park, PA
Championship
Saturday, May 7, 2011
Rec Hall, University Park, PA
                                 
  1  Southern California (1) 27 26 15 18  
4  UC Santa Barbara (3) 29 24 25 25  
  4  UC Santa Barbara (2) 25 20 19 25 9
  3  Ohio State (3) 20 25 25 22 15
2  Penn State (1) 18 26 22 23
  3  Ohio State (3) 25 24 25 25  

2012[edit]

  • April 29, 2012 – Selections
  • May 3, 2012 – Semifinals (6 p.m./8 p.m. PT) at Galen Center, Los Angeles, California: #1 seed UC Irvine defeated #4 seed Penn State 3-1 (18-25, 25-18, 25-15, 25-19); #2 seed Southern California defeated #3 seed Lewis 3-1 (25-18, 25-12, 18-25, 27-25)
  • May 5, 2012 – Championship (7 p.m. PT) at Galen Center, Los Angeles, California: UC Irvine defeated Southern California 3-0 (25-22, 34-32, 26-24); 9,612 attended (record)
  Semi-Finals
Thursday, May 3, 2012
Galen Center, Los Angeles, CA
Championship
Saturday, May 5, 2012
Galen Center, Los Angeles, CA
                                 
  1  UC Irvine (3) 18 25 25 25  
4  Penn State (1) 25 18 15 19  
  1  UC Irvine (3) 25 34 26
  2  Southern California (0) 22 32 24
2  Southern California (3) 25 25 18 27
  3  Lewis University (IL) (1) 18 12 25 25  

2013[edit]

  • April 28, 2013 – Selections
  • May 2, 2013 – Semifinals (6 p.m./8 p.m. PT) at Pauley Pavilion, Los Angeles, California, NCAA.com: No. 2-seed UC Irvine defeated No. 3-seed Loyola-Chicago 3–0; No. 1-seed BYU defeated No. 4-seed Penn State 3–0
  • May 4, 2013 – National Championship (6 p.m. PT) at Pauley Pavilion, Los Angeles, California, ESPNU: UC Irvine defeated BYU 3-0 ( 25-23, 25-22, 26-24)
  • May 4, 2013 – Game Notes: UC Irvine head coach David Kniffin became just the second coach in NCAA men’s volleyball history to win a national title in his first season; 6,295 attended the title game
  • May 4, 2013 – All-Tournament Team: Connor Hughes, who had 11 kills in the title game for UC Irvine (Most Outstanding Player); Chris Austin, UC Irvine; Michael Brinkley, UC Irvine Collin Mehring, UC Irvine; Kevin Tillie, UC Irvine; Ben Patch, BYU; Taylor Sander, BYU
  Semi-Finals
Thursday, May 2, 2013
Pauley Pavilion, Los Angeles, CA
Championship
Saturday, May 4, 2013
Pauley Pavilion, Los Angeles, CA
                                 
  1  Brigham Young (3) 25 25 25  
4  Penn State (0) 21 16 22  
  1  Brigham Young (0) 23 22 24
  2  UC Irvine (3) 25 25 26
2  UC Irvine (3) 26 25 29
  3  Loyola University Chicago (0) 24 18 27  

2014[edit]

  • The semifinals and finals 2014 tournament were held in the Gentile Arena in Chicago on the campus of Loyola University Chicago. Two quarterfinal "play-in" matches were held at the Gentile Arena two days prior to the national semifinals, as the 2014 tournament expanded to six teams for the first time ever. A second at-large was added to the field, and the champions of the newly-eligible Conference Carolinas men's volleyball division got an automatic qualification. The six teams were seeded according to the same methods used to seed the four teams in previous tournaments; the top two seeds received byes into the Final Four, while the third seed faced the sixth seed in the quarterfinals, and likewise the fourth seed faced the fifth seed.[4]
  • Apr. 29: Quarterfinals (#3 vs. #6 seed; #4 vs. #5 seed)
  • May 1: Semifinals (#1 vs. #4-#5 winner; #2 vs. #3-#6 winner)
  • May 3: NCAA Championship
  Quarterfinals
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
Gentile Arena, Chicago, IL
    Semifinals
Thursday, May 1, 2014
Gentile Arena, Chicago, IL
    Championship
Saturday, May 3, 2014
Gentile Arena, Chicago, IL
                                                   
      1  Loyola (Chicago) (3) 25 22 25 18 15  
  4  Lewis (1) 25 25 23 19     5  Penn State (2) 20 25 21 25 11    
  5  Penn State (3) 27 19 25 25         1  Loyola (Chicago) (3) 25 19 25 25
      3  Stanford (1) 17 25 19 15
      2  BYU (2) 18 25 25 27 12    
  3  Stanford (3) 25 25 25     3  Stanford (3) 25 21 22 29 15  
  6  Erskine (0) 14 16 16  

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]