North Carolina Highway 27

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NC Highway 27 marker

NC Highway 27
Route information
Maintained by NCDOT
Length: 198 mi[1] (319 km)
Existed: 1922 – present
Major junctions
West end: NC 10 near Toluca
  US 321 in Lincolnton
I‑485 in Charlotte
I‑85 in Charlotte
I‑77 / US 21 in Charlotte
I‑277 / NC 16 in Charlotte
US 74 in Charlotte
I‑73 / I‑74 / US 220 in Biscoe
East end: US 301 / NC 50 / NC 242 in Benson
Location
Counties: Cleveland, Lincoln, Gaston, Mecklenburg, Cabarrus, Stanly, Montgomery, Moore, Harnett, Johnston
Highway system
I‑26 NC 28

North Carolina Highway 27 (NC 27) is a primary state highway in the state of North Carolina. The route traverses 198 miles (319 km) through southern and central North Carolina, about 100 miles (160 km) of it as a concurrency with NC 24.

Route description[edit]

NC 27, west of Lincolnton.

NC 27 begins in Cleveland County near the unincorporated community of Toluca at a T-intersection with NC 10. From there it runs southeast to the city of Lincolnton. In Lincolnton, it serves as Main Street, and runs past the Lincoln County courthouse. From Lincolnton, it runs southeast again to Stanley where it follows Main Street. It enters Charlotte along Mount Holly Road, and follows several major thoroughfares through Charlotte, including Freedom Drive, Morehead Street, and Independence Boulevard.

On the east side of Charlotte, it begins its 100-mile (160 km) long concurrency with NC 24, approximately 1/2 of its total length. The two highways leave the city along Albemarle Road and remain joined until the unincorporated community of Johnsonville. Along this segment, they pass through the cities of Midland, Locust, Albemarle, Troy, Biscoe, and Carthage. They share further concurrencies with NC 109, NC 22, and US 15.

From the split with NC 24, the road runs northeast to Lillington where it follows Main Street, and leaves town as a concurrency with US 421. It passes Campbell University in Buies Creek before entering Johnston County and ending in Benson just short of I-95. NC 50 continues east of NC 27's terminus at US 301.

History[edit]

NC 27 was one of North Carolina's original 1922 state highways.[2] Its original routing connected Charlotte to Lincolnton. It used several streets through Charlotte, but followed roughly the same route. The road was extended several times:

  • 1923: east to Albemarle
  • 1928: west to Toluca (current terminus)
  • 1934: east to Carthage (using the concurrency with NC 24)
  • 1948-50: east to Cameron
  • 1958: east to Benson (current terminus)

NC 27 has had a tumultuous history through Charlotte. It has always served as a major east–west route through the city, but it has been rerouted numerous times on different city streets as traffic patterns changed. All of the following roads have carried NC 27 at one time or another:

  • Rozelles Ferry Rd. (1923–1936)
  • Mount Holly Road (1923–present)
  • Trade St.(1923-?)
  • Hawthorne Lane(1924–1936)
  • Central Ave.(1924–1955)
  • Albemarle Rd.(1924–present)
  • Mint St.(1936–1946)
  • Moorhead St. (1936–present)
  • Thrift Rd.(1936–1946)
  • McDowell St. (1946–1955)
  • Independence Blvd. (1955–present)
  • Freedom Dr. (?-Present)

Junction list[edit]

County Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Cleveland Toluca 0.0 0.0 NC 10 (Casar Road)
Lincoln 0.7 1.1 NC 18 (Fallston Road) – Shelby, Morganton
Hulls Crossroads 4.1 6.6 NC 274 south – Cherryville
  15.0 24.1 NC 182 west – Fallston, Lawndale
Lincolnton 15.3 24.6 To NC 150 west / West Highway 150
17.2 27.7
US 321 Bus. / NC 150 west (Generals Boulevard) – Cherryville, Gastonia, Shelby, Maiden
West end of NC 150 overlap
17.8 28.6 US 321 – Dallas, Gastonia, Hickory
Boger City 19.3 31.1 NC 150 east – Mooresville East end of NC 150 overlap
  21.0 33.8 NC 73 east – Lowesville
Gaston Stanley 30.5 49.1 NC 275 west (Chestnut Street) – Dallas
Mount Holly 36.9 59.4 NC 273 (Highland Street) – Belmont
Mecklenburg Charlotte 40.0 64.4 I‑485 – Pineville, Huntersville
45.0 72.4 I‑85 – Spartanburg, Concord
47.2 76.0 US 29 south (Morehead Street) / Freedom Drive South end of US 29 overlap
47.5 76.4 I‑77 / US 21 north – Statesville
48.1 77.4 US 29 / NC 49 north (Mint Street) North end of US 29/NC 49 overlap
48.3 77.7 NC 49 south (South Tryon Street) South end of NC 49 overlap
50.5 81.3 US 74 west (Independence Freeway) to I‑277 / NC 16 West end of US 74 overlap
Exit 243; eastbound entrance and westbound exit
52.2 84.0 Briar Creek Road – Bojangles' Coliseum Exit 244; to Ovens Auditorium
53.0 85.3 Wendover Road / Eastway Drive Exit 245; signed as exits 245A (Wendover) and 245B (Eastway)
53.8 86.6 US 74 east (Independence Boulevard) – Monroe East end of US 74 overlap
Exit 246; eastbound exit and westbound entrance
56.5 90.9 NC 24 west (WT Harris Boulevard) West end of NC 24 overlap
Mint Hill 61.3 98.7 I‑485 – Pineville, Concord
62.5 100.6 NC 51 south (Blair Road)
Cabarrus Midland 70.3 113.1 US 601 – Monroe, Concord
Stanly Locust 74.8 120.4 NC 200 (Central Avenue) – Stanfield, Monroe, Concord
Red Cross 79.0 127.1 NC 205 south – Oakboro
Albemarle 89.6 144.2 US 52 / NC 73 west (Aquadale Road) to NC 138 – Wadesboro, Salisbury South end of US 52 Bus. and west end of NC 73 overlap
89.9 144.7
US 52 Bus. north (Second Street)
North end of US 52 Bus. overlap
91.7 147.6 NC 740 north – Badin
Pee Dee River 97.7 157.2 James B. Garrison Bridge
Montgomery   97.9 157.6 NC 73 east – Mount Gilead East end of NC 73 overlap
  106.0 170.6 NC 109 south – Mount Gilead South end of NC 109 overlap
Troy 109.4 176.1 NC 109 north (Bilhen Street) – Denton North end of NC 109 and south end of NC 109 Bus. overlap
109.9 176.9
NC 134 / NC 109 Bus. north (Main Street)
North end of NC 109 Bus. overlap
Biscoe 116.5 187.5
US 220 Alt. (Main Street)
117.3 188.8 I‑73 / I‑74 / US 220 – Rockingham, Asheboro
Moore Robbins 129.1 207.8 NC 705 (Pottery Highway) – Eagle Springs, Robbins
  134.2 216.0 NC 22 north – Ramseur, Greensboro North end of NC 22 overlap
Carthage 139.3 224.2 NC 22 south (McNeill Street) South end of NC 22 overlap
140.3 225.8 US 15 / US 501 south – Pinehurst, Aberdeen South end of US 15/US 501 overlap
  142.3 229.0 US 15 / US 501 north – Sanford North end of US 15/US 501 overlap
Cameron 149.0 239.8
US 1 Bus. – Vass
  150.7 242.5 US 1 – Southern Pines, Sanford
Harnett Johnsonville 159.1 256.0 NC 24 east – Fayetteville East end of NC 24 overlap
Pineview 161.4 259.7 NC 87 – Fayetteville, Sanford
Lillington 178.8 287.8 US 401 / NC 210 south (Main Street) – Fayetteville South end of US 401/NC 210 overlap
179.2 288.4 US 421 north (Front Street) – Sanford North end of US 421 overlap
180.8 291.0 US 401 north (Cornelius Harnett Boulevard) / NC 210 north (Main Street) – Fuquay-Varina North end of US 401/NC 210 overlap
  185.8 299.0 US 421 south (Paul Green Memorial Highway) – Dunn South end of US 421 overlap; Harnett County Airport at intersection
Coats 190.0 305.8 NC 55 (McKinley Street) – Erwin, Angier
Johnston Benson 196.9 316.9 NC 50 north – Garner North end of NC 50 overlap
197.5 317.8 US 301 (Wall Street) / NC 50 south / NC 242 south (Main Street) – Dunn, Smithfield South end of NC 50 overlap
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Bannered routes[edit]

Lincolnton truck route[edit]


NC Highway 27 Truck
Location: Lincolnton, North Carolina
Length: 6.0 mi[3] (9.7 km)

North Carolina Highway 27 Truck (NC 27 Truck) is a 6.0-mile (9.7 km) route that takes truck traffic south around downtown Lincolnton, via West Highway 150 and NC 150. Signage along the route only appears at key intersections.

Thrift–Charlotte alternate route[edit]

NC Highway 27A
Location: ThriftCharlotte, NC
Length: 8.6 mi[4] (13.8 km)
Existed: 1932–1936

North Carolina Highway 27A (NC 27A) was established as a renumbering of NC 271. Starting at the former community of Thrift (located in present-day Paw Creek neighborhood), it went south from Mount Holly Road, entering Charlotte along Tuckaseegee/Thrift Roads. It then overlapped with US 29/US 74/NC 20 on Morehead Street and US 74 on McDowell Street, before reconnecting with mainline NC 27 at 7th Street. In 1936, NC 27A was replaced by mainline NC 27.

Pee Dee–Wadeville alternate route[edit]

NC Highway 27A
Location: Pee DeeWadeville, NC
Length: 12.1 mi[5] (19.5 km)
Existed: 1960–1967

North Carolina Highway 27A (NC 27A) was established when mainline NC 27 was rerouted on a more direct route between Lake Tillery and Troy, in Montgomery County. NC 27A follows NC 73 east, through Pee Dee, then continues straight along Pee Dee Road, connecting with NC 109, in Wadeville. Going back north, it reconnected with NC 27 west from Troy. In 1967, NC 27A was decommissioned, with Pee Dee Road only section to drop to a secondary road. From Lake Tillery to Wadeville, NC 27A formed the southern edge of the Uwharrie National Forest.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Google (2011-02-05). "NC 27" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 2011-02-05. 
  2. ^ NCRoads.com Annex: N.C. 25 to 29
  3. ^ Google (December 1, 2013). "NC 27 Truck - Lincolnton, North Carolina" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved December 1, 2013. 
  4. ^ Google (July 13, 2013). "North Carolina Highway 27A - Charlotte" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved July 13, 2013. 
  5. ^ Google (July 13, 2013). "North Carolina Highway 27A - Pee Dee" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved July 13, 2013. 
  6. ^ "NC 27A Route Change (1967-11-03)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. November 3, 1967. Retrieved July 13, 2013. 

External links[edit]