NGC 4889

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NGC 4889
Coma Cluster of Galaxies (visible, wide field).jpg
Wide field image of the Coma Cluster. NGC 4889 is the bright galaxy to the left, with NGC 4874 at the right. The bright foreground star on the upper right is HD 112887.
Observation data
Constellation Coma Berenices
Right ascension 13h 00m 08.1s
Declination +27° 58′ 37″
Redshift 0.021665[1]
Helio radial velocity 6495 ± 13 km/s[1]
Distance 308 ± 3 Mly (94.4 ± 0.8 Mpc)[2]
Type E4
Apparent dimensions (V) 1′.49 × 17′.8 (3′)
Apparent magnitude (V) +11.4
Notable features Brightest galaxy in the Coma Cluster
Other designations
Caldwell 35
NGC 4884 • UGC 8110 • MCG 5-31-77 • PGC 44715 • ZWG 160.241 • DRCG 27-148[3]
See also: Galaxy, List of galaxies

NGC 4889, also known as Caldwell 35, is a supergiant[4] class-4 elliptical galaxy, the brightest within the Coma Cluster and a Caldwell object in the constellation Coma Berenices. It shines at magnitude +11.4. Its celestial coordinates are RA 13h00.1m, DEC +27°59'. It is located near the G-class naked-eye star Beta Comae Berenices, the galaxy NGC 4874 (also in the Coma Cluster[4]), and the North Galactic Pole. It lies roughly 308 million light-years away.[2] The main cluster is retreating at roughly 7,000 kilometres per second (4,300 mi/s),[5] while NGC 4889 itself is retreating at 6,495 kilometres per second (4,036 mi/s).

As of December 2011, NGC 4889 harbors one of the largest directly-observed black holes to date, with a mass estimated at 21 billion solar masses (best fit; the possible range of masses is from 6 billion to 37 billion solar masses).[6]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". Results for 3C 147. Retrieved 2010-05-02. 
  2. ^ a b "Distance Results for NGC 4889". NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Databas. Retrieved 2010-05-01. 
  3. ^ Revised NGC Data for NGC 4889
  4. ^ a b Jacobsen, Den (2006). "Abell 1656, NGC 4889, NGC 4874". astrophoto.net. Retrieved 2008-08-09. 
  5. ^ Block, Adam (2003-02-22). "Best of AOP: Coma Cluster (NGC 4889 and NGC 4874)". NOAO - AOP. Retrieved 2008-08-09. 
  6. ^ McConnell, Nicholas J. (2011-12-08). "Two ten-billion-solar-mass black holes at the centres of giant elliptical galaxies". Nature. Archived from the original on 2011-12-06. Retrieved 2011-12-06. 

References[edit]

  • Pasachoff, Jay M. (2000). "Atlas of the Sky". Stars and Planets. New York, NY: Peterson Field Guides. ISBN 0-395-93432-X. 
  • Eicher, David J. (1988). The Universe from Your Backyard: A Guide to Deep-Sky Objects from Astronomy Magazine. AstroMedia (Kalmbach Publishing Company). ISBN 0-521-36299-7. 

External links[edit]