NLM CityHopper

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NLM CityHopper
Nlmlogo.png
IATA
HN
ICAO
NLM
Callsign
CITY
Founded 1966 (1966)
Commenced operations 29 August 1966 (1966-08-29)
Ceased operations 31 March 1991 (1991-03-31) (rebranded as KLM CityHopper)
Hubs
Parent company KLM (100%)
Headquarters Amsterdam Airport
Haarlemmermeer, Netherlands

NLM CityHopper full name Nederlandse Luchtvaart Maatschappij (Dutch Aviation Company), was a Dutch commuter airline, founded in 1966. Its head office was in Building 70 in Schiphol Airport East in Haarlemmermeer, Netherlands.[1]

History[edit]

NLM Fokker F.27 Friendship wearing the initial titles without CityHopper at Groningen in 1967
An NLM CityHopper Fokker F27-200 at Euroairport. (1982)

The carrier was formed as Nederlandse Luchtvaart Maatschappij (NLM) in 1966.[2] Starting operations on 29 August 1966 using leased Fokker F27 equipment from the Royal Dutch Air Force, it was set up as a KLM subsidiary under a two-year contract to operate domestic services within the Netherlands.[2] The airline saw the incorporation of the Fokker F28 in 1978.[3]:1790[4]

Amsterdam, Eindhoven, Enschede, Groningen, Maastricht, and Rotterdam comprised the airline's network at the beginning.[2] The Eindhoven–Hamburg route was the first international service flown by the airline; it was initially aimed at providing an scheduled executive service for Philips, and was made public in April 1974 (1974-04).[5] London-Gatwick was added to the network in early 1975.[6]

The airline changed its name to NLM CityHopper/Netherlines, following the acquisition of Netherlines by its parent company KLM in April 1988 (1988-04); operations of both subsidiaries were subsequently merged.[7] Despite sharing itheir operational structure, both companies were separate entities until 1 April 1991, when they were absorbed into the newly created KLM Cityhopper.[8]

Destinations[edit]

An NLM CityHopper Fokker F-27-200 at Jersey Airport. (1983)
An NLM CityHopper Fokker F-28-4000 at Charles de Gaulle Airport. (1980)

The airline served the following destinations throughout its history:

City Airport Code Airport Name Refs
IATA ICAO
 Belgium
Antwerp ANR EBAW Antwerp International Airport [7]
Brussels BRU EBBR Brussels Airport [7]
 France
Paris CDG LFPG Charles de Gaulle Airport [9]
Strasbourg SXB LFST Strasbourg Airport [7]
 Germany
Bremen BRE EDDW Bremen Airport [7]
Düsseldorf DUS EDDL Düsseldorf International Airport [7]
Hannover HAJ EDDV Hannover-Langenhagen Airport [7]
Stuttgart STR EDDS Stuttgart Airport [7]
 Guernsey
Guernsey GCI EGJB Guernsey Airport [7]
 Jersey
Jersey JER EGJJ Jersey Airport [7]
 Luxembourg
Luxembourg LUX ELLX Findel Airport [7]
 Netherlands
Amsterdam AMS EHAM Schiphol Airport [7]
Eindhoven EIN EHEH Eindhoven Airport [7]
Enschede ENS EHTW Enschede Airport Twente [2]
Groningen GRQ EHGG Groningen Airport Eelde [2]
Maastricht MST EHBK Maastricht Aachen Airport [7]
Rotterdam RTM EHRD Rotterdam The Hague Airport [2]
 Sweden
Malmö MMX ESMS Malmö Airport [7]
 United Kingdom
Belfast BHD EGAC George Best Belfast City Airport [citation needed]
Birmingham BHX EGBB Birmingham Airport [7]
Bristol BRS EGGD Bristol Airport [7]
Cardiff CWL EGFF Cardiff Airport [7]
East Midlands EMA EGNX East Midlands Airport [7]
London LGW EGKK Gatwick Airport [7]
LHR EGLL Heathrow Airport [7]
LTN EGGW Luton Airport [7]
Southampton SOU EGHI Southampton Airport [7]

Fleet[edit]

A preserved Fokker F27 in the initial colour scheme of NLM
An NLM CityHopper Fokker F-28-4000 at Charles de Gaulle Airport. This particular aircraft crashed on 6 October 1981 because of bad weather.

Following is a list of aircraft flown by the airline throughout its history.

Accidents and incidents[edit]

According to Aviation Safety Network, NLM CityHopper records a single accident/incident event.[12]

  • 6 October 1981: A Fokker F-28-4000, registration PH-CHI, that was operating the first leg of an international scheduled Rotterdam–Eindhoven–Hamburg passenger service as NLM CityHopper Flight 431, entered a tornado that caused the starboard wing to separate from the fuselage. The aircraft dived into the ground from 3,000 ft (910 m) and crashed near Moerdijk, killing all 17 people aboard.[13]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "World Airline Directory." Flight International. May 16, 1981. 1452. "Head Office: Building 70, Schiphol Airport East, Amsterdam, Netherlands."
  2. ^ a b c d e f "WORLD AIRLINE SURVEY... – Nederlandse Luchtvaart Maatschappij (NLM)" (PDF). Flight International: 581. 13 April 1967. Retrieved 12 November 2011. 
  3. ^ "COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT OF THE WORLD – Fokker-VFW International" (PDF). Flight International: 1789 – 1791. 11 November 1978. Retrieved 14 November 2011. The Mk 4000 is now operating with a number of European internal airlines. NLM CityHopper and Air Anglia have both introduced the aircraft this year... 
  4. ^ "Air transport" (PDF). Flight International: 1361. 6 May 1978. Retrieved 14 November 2011. Above First F.28 in NLM CityHopper livery. 
  5. ^ "AIR TRANSPORT... – NLM GOES INTERNATIONAL" (PDF). Flight International: 358. 21 March 1974. Retrieved 13 November 2011. 
  6. ^ "AIR TRANSPORT" (PDF). Flight International: 227. 13 February 1975. Retrieved 13 November 2011. KLM's subsidiary NLM has started a twice-daily, four-days-a week service between Eindhoven and London Gatwick, using Fokker F.27s. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac "World Airline Directory – NLM CityHopper/Netherlines" (PDF). Flight International: 114. 14 March 1990 – 20 March 1990. Retrieved 12 November 2011.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  8. ^ "World Airline Directory – KLM CityHopper" (PDF). Flight International: 98. 27 March 1991 – 2 April 1991. Retrieved 12 November 2011.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  9. ^ "Licensed ATR42 tours USA" (PDF). Flight International: 6. 5 October 1985. Retrieved 14 November 2011. KLM subsidiary NLM CityHopper already flies Rotterdam-Paris Charles de Gaulle... 
  10. ^ "WORLD AIRLINES 1970... – Nederlandse Luchtvaart Maatschappij (NLM)" (PDF). Flight International: 492. 26 March 1970. Retrieved 13 November 2011. 
  11. ^ "KLM orders the F.100" (PDF). Flight International: 20. 8 June 1985. Retrieved 14 November 2011. The Dutch carrier was one of Fokker's first customers for the F.27. Its subsidiary airline NLM CityHopper currently flies four F.28-3000s and three F.27-500s. 
  12. ^ "Accident record for NLM CityHopper". Aviation Safety Network. 28 November 2004. Retrieved 12 November 2011. 
  13. ^ Accident description for PH-CHI at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 November 2011.