NS-2359

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
NS-2359
NStwothreefivenine.png
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(1R,2R,3S,5S)-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(methoxymethyl)-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane
Clinical data
Legal status
?
Identifiers
ATC code None
PubChem CID 11408320
Chemical data
Formula C15H19Cl2NO 
Mol. mass 300.223 g/mol
 YesY (what is this?)  (verify)

NS-2359 (GSK-372,475) is a serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor. It was under development by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) as an antidepressant,[1] but was discontinued in 2009 when phase II clinical trials turned up disappointing results and did not support further effort by the company.[1] NS-2359 was also in clinical trials for the treatment of ADHD,[2] phase II having been completed in 2007.[3] A trial exploring the effect of NS-2359 on cocaine-experienced individuals is currently ongoing.[4]

Another scientific article on NS-2359 was recently (2011) published.[5] As can be seen from reading the abstract to the citation, the compound failed to perform in clinical trials for the treatment of depression.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "NeuroSearch announces the results of Phase II Proof of Concept studies with NS2359 in depression". 
  2. ^ Wilens, T. E.; Klint, T.; Adler, L.; West, S.; Wesnes, K.; Graff, O.; Mikkelsen, B. (2008). "A randomized controlled trial of a novel mixed monoamine reuptake inhibitor in adults with ADHD". Behavioral and Brain Functions 4: 24. doi:10.1186/1744-9081-4-24. PMC 2442604. PMID 18554401.  edit
  3. ^ http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00467428
  4. ^ http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00032916
  5. ^ Learned, S.; Graff, O.; Roychowdhury, S.; Moate, R.; Krishnan, K. R.; Archer, G.; Modell, J. G.; Alexander, R.; Zamuner, S.; Lavergne, A.; Evoniuk, G.; Ratti, E. (2011). "Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of a triple reuptake inhibitor GSK372475 in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder: Two randomized, placebo- and active-controlled clinical trials". Journal of Psychopharmacology 26 (5): 653–662. doi:10.1177/0269881111424931. PMID 22048884.  edit