Nain, Newfoundland and Labrador

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Nain
Nunajnguk
Town
Nain as viewed from Mt. Sophie, September 2011.
Nain as viewed from Mt. Sophie, September 2011.
Nain is located in Newfoundland and Labrador
Nain
Nain
Location of Nain in the province
Coordinates: 56°32′32″N 61°41′34″W / 56.54222°N 61.69278°W / 56.54222; -61.69278Coordinates: 56°32′32″N 61°41′34″W / 56.54222°N 61.69278°W / 56.54222; -61.69278
Country  Canada
Province  Newfoundland and Labrador
Region Nunatsiavut
Settled 1771
Government
 • Type Inuit Community Government
 • Mayor (AngajukKâk) Tony Andersen
 • Federal MP Yvonne Jones (L)
 • Provincial MHA Randy Edmunds (L)
Area
 • Total 94.58 km2 (36.52 sq mi)
Elevation 11 m (36 ft)
Population (2006)[1]
 • Total 1,034
 • Density 10.9/km2 (28/sq mi)
Time zone AST (UTC-4)
 • Summer (DST) Atlantic Daylight Saving Time (UTC-3)
Postal code span A0P
Area code(s) 709

Nain or Naina (Inuit: Nunajnguk)[2] is the northernmost town of any significant size in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, located about 370 kilometres by air from Happy Valley-Goose Bay. The town was established as a Moravian mission in 1771 by Jens Haven and other missionaries. The current population is 1,034, predominantly Inuit and mixed Inuit-European.

History[edit]

On December 1, 2005, Nain became the administrative capital of the autonomous region of Nunatsiavut which is the name chosen by the Labrador Inuit when the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement Act was successfully ratified by the Canadian Government and the Inuit of Labrador. Hopedale, further south, is the legislative capital.[3] The land claim cedes limited self-rule for the Nunatsiavut government in Northern Labrador and North-Eastern Quebec, granting title and aboriginal rights.[3] The land that composes the Nunatsiavut government is called the Labrador Inuit Settlement Area, or LISA, which amount to approximately 72,500 km2 (28,000miles2).[4] The Inuit of Labrador do not own this land per se, but they do have special rights related to traditional land use as aboriginals. That said, the Labrador Inuit will own 15,000 km2 (6,100miles2) within the Settlement Area, officially designated as Labrador Inuit Lands. The Agreement also provides for the establishment of the Torngat Mountains National Park Reserve, consisting of about 9,600 square kilometres (3,700 sq mi) of land within LISA.[4][5] Nunatsiavut is not to be confused with the Nunavut territory.

Many Inuit from Hebron were relocated to Nain by the provincial government after the Moravian mission at Hebron was closed under government pressure in 1959.

Geography[edit]

Nain is located on the north side of Unity Bay, a small inlet. The bay is open to the Atlantic Ocean but Nain's harbour is protected by numerous islands, the largest of which is Paul's Island. From Nain to the open Labrador Sea is approximately 50 km east through Strathcona Run. Nain is inaccessible by road and may be reached only by air or sea.

Climate[edit]

Although located at the same latitude as Ketchikan on North America’s west coast or Moscow in Europe, the influence of the Labrador Current gives Nain a marginal subarctic climate that is very close to a polar climate (ET), which creates the southernmost tree line in the northern hemisphere on the adjacent coast. The southernmost tundra is actually still in a zone of discontinuous permafrost rather than the much more typical continuous zone.[6] The almost constant presence of the Icelandic Low means that precipitation, both as rain and snow, is exceptionally heavy for so consistently cold a climate in a low-lying area, with five metres of snow falling each winter and not melting until July. The actual depth of snow on the ground averages 1.13 metres (44 in) at the end of March.

Climate data for Nain
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 15.7
(60.3)
7.6
(45.7)
12.1
(53.8)
14.5
(58.1)
25.6
(78.1)
33.3
(91.9)
33.3
(91.9)
32.7
(90.9)
26.1
(79)
19.4
(66.9)
11.7
(53.1)
6.7
(44.1)
33.3
(91.9)
Average high °C (°F) −14.0
(6.8)
−13.6
(7.5)
−7.3
(18.9)
−0.3
(31.5)
5.1
(41.2)
11.0
(51.8)
15.1
(59.2)
15.6
(60.1)
10.9
(51.6)
4.2
(39.6)
−1.8
(28.8)
−8.8
(16.2)
1.3
(34.3)
Daily mean °C (°F) −18.5
(−1.3)
−18.3
(−0.9)
−12.3
(9.9)
−4.9
(23.2)
1.0
(33.8)
6.2
(43.2)
10.1
(50.2)
10.7
(51.3)
7.0
(44.6)
1.1
(34)
−5.1
(22.8)
−12.8
(9)
−2.98
(26.65)
Average low °C (°F) −23.1
(−9.6)
−22.9
(−9.2)
−17.3
(0.9)
−9.5
(14.9)
−3.0
(26.6)
1.4
(34.5)
5.2
(41.4)
5.7
(42.3)
3.0
(37.4)
−2.1
(28.2)
−8.3
(17.1)
−16.8
(1.8)
−7.3
(18.9)
Record low °C (°F) −42.5
(−44.5)
−38.3
(−36.9)
−37.0
(−34.6)
−31.1
(−24)
−17.5
(0.5)
−6.7
(19.9)
−2.8
(27)
−2.8
(27)
−6.7
(19.9)
−19.0
(−2.2)
−24.4
(−11.9)
−41.5
(−42.7)
−42.5
(−44.5)
Wind chill −52.9 −59.5 −54 −41.3 −20.8 −10.1 −5 −3.4 −9.1 −31.2 −33.3 −55.5 −59.5
Precipitation mm (inches) 78.4
(3.087)
56.2
(2.213)
86.6
(3.409)
71.5
(2.815)
57.3
(2.256)
79.9
(3.146)
86.8
(3.417)
69.2
(2.724)
76.8
(3.024)
64.9
(2.555)
79.0
(3.11)
86.2
(3.394)
892.8
(35.15)
Rainfall mm (inches) 1.3
(0.051)
0.9
(0.035)
4.2
(0.165)
12.7
(0.5)
28.4
(1.118)
63.9
(2.516)
86.8
(3.417)
69.2
(2.724)
74.2
(2.921)
37.9
(1.492)
15.3
(0.602)
5.7
(0.224)
400.5
(15.765)
Snowfall cm (inches) 77.2
(30.39)
55.3
(21.77)
82.5
(32.48)
58.7
(23.11)
28.8
(11.34)
16.0
(6.3)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
2.6
(1.02)
26.9
(10.59)
63.8
(25.12)
80.3
(31.61)
492.2
(193.78)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 12.1 9.9 13.3 13.1 12.9 13.7 13.6 12.9 13.8 13.2 12.7 13.8 155
Avg. rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm) 0.5 0.5 1.2 3.1 7.1 12.7 13.6 12.9 13.5 8.1 2.1 1.1 76.4
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm) 12.1 9.9 13.1 11.6 8.3 2.8 0.0 0.0 1.0 7.6 11.6 13.5 91.5
Source: Environment Canada[7]

Local government[edit]

The town is governed by a seven member council composed of a mayor (or AngajukKâk), deputy mayor (Deputy AngajukKâk), and five councilors. In 2004 Sarah Leo was the mayor with George Lyall as deputy mayor, while the remaining councilors were Mary White, Isabella Pain, Margaret Fox, Duane Dicker, and Jacob Larkin.[8]

The Town Council formally changed its name from "Nain Town Council" to "Nain Inuit Community Government" in October 2006. The Nain Inuit Community Government meets once per month.

Industry[edit]

Fishing is the main industry in Nain. Traditional hunting and trapping activities continue through the winter months after the fishing season has ended.

Transport[edit]

Flights to Nain are at Nain Airport, and are available from Happy Valley-Goose Bay on Air Labrador and Provincial Airlines.

Between mid-June and mid-November (pending ice conditions), the ferry MV Northern Ranger,operated by the Newfoundland and Labrador Government, provides weekly service [1] from Goose Bay along the Atlantic Coast, with stops in Rigolet, Makkovik, Postville, Hopedale and Natuashish. Nain is the northernmost stop on the route; the ferry stays docked at Nain for about three hours before beginning its southbound route.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]