Nancy Garden

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Nancy Garden
Born May 15, 1938
Boston, Massachusetts
Died June 23, 2014(2014-06-23) (aged 76)
Carlisle, Massachusetts
Occupation Writer
Nationality American
Period 1971–2012
Genre Young-adult and children's novels
supernatural fiction
Literary movement LGBT literature
Notable work Annie on My Mind
Notable awards Margaret Edwards Award
2003
Partner Sandy Scott (45 years)
Website
www.nancygarden.com

Nancy Garden (May 15, 1938 – June 23, 2014) was an American writer of fiction for children and young adults, best known for the lesbian novel Annie on My Mind. She received the 2003 Margaret Edwards Award from the American Library Association recognizing her lifetime contribution in writing for teens, citing Annie alone.[1][2]

Annie On My Mind was awarded the Lee Lynch Classic Award by the Golden Crown Literary Society in 2014, cited as one of the most important classics in lesbian literature.[citation needed]

Biography[edit]

Garden was born in 1938 in Boston. She was an only child who "took refuge in books, in writing, and in telling long stories to myself and sometimes acting them out."[3] She earned a B.F.A. (1961) and an M.A. (1962) from Columbia University School of Dramatic Arts. Through school and for several years after college, Garden worked in theater, supplementing the work with odd jobs in offices. She later taught school and worked as an editor of children's literature. She has also written non-fiction, mystery and fantasy for children and young adults.

Garden is best known for Annie on My Mind, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in 1982. It was critically acclaimed but attracted controversy because of its lesbian characters, Annie and Liza, who fall in love. It was one of the first teen novels to feature lesbian characters in a positive light.[4] "I wrote it to give solace to young gay people, to let them know they were not alone, that they could be happy and well adjusted and also to let heterosexual kids know that we gay people aren't monsters," she told Booklist in a 1996 interview.[5]

In 1993, Annie on My Mind was banned by the Kansas City school system and burnt in demonstrations. It was returned to shelves only after a First Amendment lawsuit by students in 1995. It is #44 on the American Library Association list of 100 books most frequently challenged during the 1990s.[6]

Garden received the Robert B. Downs Award for Intellectual Freedom in 2001 from the University of Illinois Graduate School of Library and Information Science.[7][8]

The ALA Margaret A. Edwards Award recognizes one writer and a particular body of work "for significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature." Garden won the annual award in 2003, when the panel cited Annie on My Mind alone and called her "the first author for young adults to create a lesbian love story with a positive ending ... Using a fluid, readable style, Garden opens a window through which readers can find courage to be true to themselves."[1] Five years later Garden recalled that "I was and still am enormously grateful ... for YALSA’s recognition ... of the importance of YA books about LGBT youth."[9]

Garden's reviews of young adult titles have appeared in the Lambda Literary Foundation's Lambda Book Report.

She spent many years living between Massachusetts and Maine, with partner Sandy Scott, their golden retriever, Loki, and their cats.[10]

Death[edit]

Nancy Garden died of a heart attack on June 23, 2014, aged 76.[11]

Works[edit]

Fiction[edit]

  • What Happened in Marston (1971)
  • The Loners (1972)
  • Mist Maiden (1975)
  • Annie on My Mind (1982)
  • Maria's Mountain (1983)
  • Prisoner of Vampires (1984)
  • Peace, O River (1986)
  • Lark in the Morning (1991)
  • My Sister, the Vampire (1992)
  • Dove and Sword: A Novel of Joan of Arc (1995)
  • My Brother, the Werewolf (1995)
  • Good Moon Rising (1996)
  • The Year They Burned the Books (1999)
  • Holly's Secret (2000)
  • Prisoners of Vampires (2001)
  • The Case of the Stolen Scarab (2002)
  • Nora and Liz (2002)
  • Meeting Melanie (2002)
  • Molly's Family (2004)
  • Endgame (2006)
  • Hear Us Out! (2007)

Weird and Horrible[edit]

  • Vampires (1973)
  • Werewolves (1973)
  • Witches (1975)
  • Devils and Demons
  • The Ghost Inside Me

Fours Crossing[edit]

  • Fours Crossing (1981)
  • Watersmeet (1983)
  • The Door Between (1987)

Nonfiction[edit]

  • The Kids' Code and Cipher Book (1988)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2003 Margaret A. Edwards Award Winner". Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA). American Library Association (ALA).
      "Edwards Award", ala.org; retrieved 2013-10-10.
  2. ^ [1]. Authors4Teens.[dead link]
  3. ^ Something About the Author, Volume 12, p. 86, quoted in Frances Ann Day, Lesbian and Gay Voices. Greenwood Press.
  4. ^ "Nancy Garden". TeenReads (teenreads.com).
  5. ^ Quoted in Frances Ann Day, Lesbian and gay voices, Greenwood Press.[full citation needed]
  6. ^ "100 most frequently challenged books: 1990–1999". Banned & Challenged Books. ALA; retrieved 2013-10-13.
  7. ^ "Robert B. Downs Intellectual Freedom Award". Library and Information Science, University of Illinois (lis.illinois.edu).
  8. ^ "Author Update: Nancy Garden" (interview by CLS). Cynsations (blog). Cynthia Leitich Smith. June 7, 2007.
  9. ^ "Looking Back". YALSA. ALA. 2008. Retrieved 2013-10-13. On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Edwards Award.
  10. ^ "About me". Nancy Garden (nancygarden.com).
  11. ^ Victoria, Brownworth. "In Remembrance: Nancy Garden". Lambda Literary Review. Lambda Literary Foundation. Retrieved 23 June 2014. 

External links[edit]