Nancy Springer

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Nancy Connor Springer (born 1948 in Montclair, New Jersey) is an American author of fantasy, young adult literature, mystery, and science fiction.[1] Her novel Larque on the Wing won the Tiptree Award.[2] She also received the Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America[3] for her novels Toughing It and Looking for Jamie Bridger, in addition to receiving the Carolyn W. Field award for I am Mordred. A prolific author, she has written more than fifty books over a career that has spanned nearly four decades.

Works[edit]

Series[edit]

Book of the Isle[edit]

  1. The White Hart (1979)
  2. The Book of Suns (1977) expanded as The Silver Sun (1980)
  3. The Sable Moon (1981)
  4. The Black Beast (1982)
  5. The Golden Swan (1983)

Sea King[edit]

  1. Madbond (1987)
  2. Mindbond (1987)
  3. Godbond (1988)

Tales of Rowan Hood[edit]

  1. Rowan Hood: Outlaw Girl of Sherwood Forest (2001)
  2. Lionclaw (2002)
  3. Outlaw Princess of Sherwood (2003)
  4. Wild Boy (2004)
  5. Rowan Hood Returns (2005)

The Enola Holmes Mysteries[edit]

  1. The Case of the Missing Marquess (2006)
  2. The Case of the Left-Handed Lady (2007)
  3. The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets (2008)
  4. The Case of the Peculiar Pink Fan (2008)
  5. The Case of the Cryptic Crinoline (2009)
  6. The Case of the Gypsy Goodbye (2010)

Other novels[edit]

Collections[edit]

  • Chance and Other Gestures of the Hand of Fate (1985)
  • Stardark Songs (1993)

Anthologies edited[edit]

  • Prom Night (1999) with Martin H. Greenberg
  • Ribbiting Tales: Original Stories About Frogs (2000)

Anthologies containing stories by Nancy Springer[edit]

  • Top Fantasy (1984)
  • Catfantastic II (1990)
  • A Century of Fantasy 1980-1989 (1990)
  • The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror Fifth Annual Collection (1992)
  • Horses! (1994)
  • The Best of Weird Tales (1995)
  • Chicks in Chainmail (1995)
  • Castle Fantastic (1996)
  • Sisters in Fantasy 2 (1996)
  • The Fortune Teller (1997)
  • More Amazing Stories (1997)
  • Tarot Fantastic (1997)
  • Things Invisible to See: Gay and Lesbian Tales of Magic Realism (1998)
  • Twice Upon a Time (1999)
  • Civil War Fantastic (2000)
  • Perchance to Dream (2000)
  • Sherwood (2000)

Short stories[edit]

  • "Amends, A Tale of the Sun Kings" (1983)
  • "The Boy Who Plaited Manes" (1986)
  • "In Carnation" (1990)
  • "Snickerdoodles" (1990)
  • "To Be a Hero" (1991)
  • "Who's Gonna Rock Us Home?" (1991)
  • "Whoops!" (1995)
  • "Concrete Example" (1996)
  • "Elvis Lives" (1997)
  • "Hexefus" (1997)
  • "The Time of Her Life" (1998)
  • "Gilly the Goose Girl" (1999)
  • "Dreamfisher" (2000)
  • "Know Your True Enemy" (2000)
  • "Martial" (2000)
  • "The Way Your Life Is"

Awards and nominations[edit]

  • Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adult Literature Best Novel nominee (1982): The Sable Moon[4]
  • World Fantasy Best Short Story nominee (1987): "The Boy Who Plaited Manes"[5]
  • Hugo Best Short Story nominee (1987): "The Boy Who Plaited Manes"[6]
  • Nebula Best Short Story nominee (1987): "The Boy Who Plaited Manes"
  • Tiptree Award (1995): Larque on the Wing[2]
  • Edgar Award for Best Young Adult Mystery (1995): Toughing It[3]
  • Edgar Award for Best Juvenile Mystery (1996): Looking for Jamie Bridger[3]
  • Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adult Literature Best Novel nominee (1997): Fair Peril[4]
  • Carolyn W. Field Award (1999): I am Mordred[7]
  • Edgar Award for Best Juvenile Mystery nominee (2007): The Case of the Missing Marquess: An Enola Holmes Mystery[3]
  • Edgar Award for Best Juvenile Mystery nominee (2010): The Case of the Cryptic Crinoline: An Enola Holmes Mystery[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Davis, Stephen M. "The SF Site Featured Review: I am Mordred: A Tale from Camelot". SF Site. Retrieved 25 September 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "Previous Awards—James Tiptree, Jr. Literary Award Council". James Tiptree, Jr. Literary Award Council. Retrieved 25 September 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "Edgar Award Winners and Nominees Database". TheEdgars.com. Retrieved 25 September 2011. 
  4. ^ a b "Mythopoeic Awards – Fantasy". Mythopoeic Society. Retrieved 25 September 2011. 
  5. ^ "World Fantasy Awards -- Complete Listing". World Fantasy Convention. Retrieved 25 September 2011. 
  6. ^ "1987 Hugo Awards". The Hugo Awards. Retrieved 25 September 2011. 
  7. ^ "Carolyn W. Field Award". Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Retrieved 2 March 2013. 

External links[edit]