Nanolaser

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A nanolaser, also referred to as a miniature laser is a laser, namely a light amplifier by stimulated emission of radiation, that has nanoscale dimensions. While the word nano originates from Greek νᾶνος (=dwarf), the international system of units has adapted the prefix as a quantifier equal to 10−9. The nanolaser concept was develop by Mark Stockman at Georgia State University in 2003.

This tiny laser can be modulated quickly and, combined with its small footprint, makes it an ideal candidate for on-chip optical computing. The intense optical fields of such a nanolaser also enables the enhancement effect in non-linear optics or surface-enhanced-raman-scattering (SERS),[1] and therefore paves the way toward integrated nanophotonic circuitry.[2]

In 2012, researchers at Northwestern University published a description of a working room-temperature nanolaser "based on three-dimensional (3D) Au bowtie (nanoparticles) supported by an organic gain material," constructs which were thought to be suitable for inclusion in photonic circuit architectures.[3]

In February 2012, researchers at University of California San Diego demonstrated the first thresholdless laser and the smallest room temperature nanolaser using plasmonic nanoscale coaxial structures.[4]


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References[edit]

  1. ^ Anker, Jeffrey N. et al. (June 2008), "Biosensing with plasmonic nanosensors", Nature Materials 7: 442–453, Bibcode:2008NatMa...7..442A, doi:10.1038/nmat2162, PMID 18497851, retrieved November 7, 2012 
    Abstract available free of charge; full text requires purchase or subscription.
  2. ^ Oulton, R. F. et al. (October 2009), "Plasmon lasers at deep subwavelength scale", Nature 461: 629–632, Bibcode:2009Natur.461..629O, doi:10.1038/nature08364, PMID 19718019, retrieved November 7, 2012 
    Abstract available free of charge; full text requires purchase or subscription.
  3. ^ Suh, Jae Yong et al. (September 2012), "Plasmonic Bowtie Nanolaser Arrays", Nano Lett., Article ASAP, Bibcode:2012NanoL..12.5769S, doi:10.1021/nl303086r, retrieved November 7, 2012, lay summaryNorthwestern University Press Release (November 5, 2012) 
    Abstract available free of charge; full text requires purchase or subscription.
  4. ^ Khajavikhan, M. et al. (February 2012), "Thresholdless nanoscale coaxial lasers", Nature 482: 204–207, arXiv:1108.4749, Bibcode:2012Natur.482..204K, doi:10.1038/nature10840, PMID 22318604 
    Abstract available free of charge; full text requires purchase or subscription.

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