Naoto Sato

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Asteroids discovered: 142
7038 Tokorozawa[1] February 22, 1995
7851 Azumino December 29, 1996
8581 Johnen December 28, 1996
8924 Iruma December 14, 1996
8933 Kurobe January 6, 1997
9230 Yasuda December 29, 1996
9418 Mayumi[1] November 18, 1995
10224 Hisashi October 26, 1997
10880 Kaguya November 6, 1996
10916 Okina-Ouna December 31, 1997
(11114) 1995 WV5[1] November 16, 1995
(11607) 1995 WX1[1] November 16, 1995
12027 Masaakitanaka[1] January 3, 1997
12031 Kobaton January 30, 1997
12432 Usuda[1] January 12, 1996
12456 Genichiaraki January 2, 1997
12460 Mando January 3, 1997
12469 Katsuura January 9, 1997
13188 Okinawa January 3, 1997
13654 Masuda February 9, 1997
(13694) 1997 WW7 November 23, 1997
15884 Maspalomas February 27, 1997
15916 Shigeoyamada October 25, 1997
(16716) 1995 UX6[1] October 21, 1995
16723 Fumiofuke[1] November 27, 1995
16790 Yuuzou January 2, 1997
16796 Shinji February 6, 1997
16826 Daisuke November 19, 1997
16853 Masafumi December 21, 1997
17612 Whiteknight[1] October 20, 1995
17656 Hayabusa November 6, 1996
17657 Himawari November 6, 1996
(17666) 1996 XR December 1, 1996
18469 Hakodate[1] October 20, 1995
(18488) 1996 AY3[1] January 13, 1996
18520 Wolfratshausen November 6, 1996
18553 Kinkakuji January 6, 1997
20193 Yakushima January 18, 1997
21250 Kamikouchi December 17, 1995
21302 Shirakamisanchi December 1, 1996
21348 Toyoteru March 1, 1997
22470 Shirakawa-go February 9, 1997
(23586) 1995 TA1[1] October 13, 1995
23628 Ichimura December 8, 1996
(23630) 1996 YA3 December 30, 1996
23638 Nagano January 6, 1997
23649 Tohoku February 1, 1997
(23963) 1998 WY8 November 18, 1998
25302 Niim December 9, 1998
26223 Enari December 3, 1997
(26224) 1997 XF2 December 3, 1997
(26902) 1995 YR[1] December 17, 1995
26990 Culbertson November 23, 1997
26998 Iriso December 25, 1997
27918 Azusagawa November 6, 1996
27982 Atsushimiyazaki October 26, 1997
27991 Koheijimiura November 6, 1996
27997 Bandos November 23, 1997
28173 Hisakichi November 11, 1998
28174 Harue November 12, 1998
29420 Ikuo January 9, 1997
(29421) 1997 AV18 January 9, 1997
29514 Karatsu December 25, 1997
(29644) 1998 VA33 November 11, 1998
(31075) 1996 XV December 1, 1996
(31083) 1996 XE32 December 14, 1996
(31084) 1996 YX2 December 29, 1996
31087 Oirase January 9, 1997
31095 Buneiou February 27, 1997
31179 Gongju December 21, 1997
(31199) 1998 AK3 January 5, 1998
(32984) 1996 XX December 1, 1996
32990 Sayo-hime December 30, 1996
(32998) 1997 CK5 February 1, 1997
(33070) 1997 WY7 November 23, 1997
(33088) 1997 XX9 December 3, 1997
(33096) 1997 YS6 December 25, 1997
(35322) 1997 CX16 February 6, 1997
(35400) 1997 YU2 December 21, 1997
(35401) 1997 YW2 December 21, 1997
(37743) 1996 XQ December 1, 1996
(37746) 1996 XD32 December 14, 1996
(39818) 1997 YR4 December 24, 1997
(43919) 1996 BG3[1] January 18, 1996
(43949) 1997 AU18 January 9, 1997
(44012) 1997 UL22 October 26, 1997
(48734) 1997 CZ16 February 6, 1997
(52479) 1995 TZ[1] October 13, 1995
(52546) 1996 XW December 1, 1996
(52550) 1996 YB3 December 30, 1996
(52623) 1997 VY6 November 6, 1997
(52629) 1997 WA8 November 23, 1997
(53019) 1998 VW32 November 11, 1998
(55883) 1997 WF8 November 23, 1997
(58410) 1995 YS[1] December 17, 1995
(58613) 1997 UN7 October 25, 1997
(58614) 1997 UO7 October 25, 1997
(58619) 1997 UF22 October 26, 1997
(58620) 1997 UG22 October 26, 1997
(58662) 1997 XJ2 December 3, 1997
(58667) 1997 YS2 December 21, 1997
(65838) 1996 XD26 December 8, 1996
(69411) 1995 UR8[1] October 21, 1995
(69482) 1996 XC26 December 8, 1996
(69486) 1997 AM1 January 2, 1997
(69490) 1997 AE5 January 3, 1997
(69562) 1997 YU6 December 25, 1997
(73867) 1997 AH1 January 2, 1997
(73968) 1997 YQ4 December 24, 1997
(90880) 1996 WZ2 November 30, 1996
(90883) 1996 XB26 December 8, 1996
(90951) 1997 VX6 November 6, 1997
(90955) 1997 WB2 November 19, 1997
(90982) 1997 XE2 December 3, 1997
(96319) 1997 CL5 February 1, 1997
(96321) 1997 CW16 February 6, 1997
(96368) 1997 XH2 December 3, 1997
(96369) 1997 XM2 December 3, 1997
(96372) 1997 YP4 December 24, 1997
(100389) 1995 WU8[1] November 24, 1995
(100499) 1996 XP December 1, 1996
(100689) 1997 YW6 December 25, 1997
(100703) 1998 AL3 January 5, 1998
(101431) 1998 VX32 November 11, 1998
118230 Sado November 30, 1996
(120665) 1996 XT December 1, 1996
(120741) 1997 UJ22 October 26, 1997
(120974) 1998 WW8 November 18, 1998
(129600) 1997 WZ1 November 19, 1997
136743 Echigo[1] November 16, 1995
(136790) 1996 YV2 December 29, 1996
(160025) 1996 XS December 1, 1996
(162144) 1998 VZ32 November 11, 1998
(164696) 1997 WB8 November 23, 1997
(175768) 1998 VB33 November 11, 1998
(192452) 1997 YQ2 December 21, 1997
(200141) 1997 XZ1 December 3, 1997
(210489) 1997 AB22 January 15, 1997
(251709) 1997 AA5 January 2, 1997
(269706) 1997 WX7 November 23, 1997
(297291) 1997 XG2 December 3, 1997
(336762) 2011 AG27 December 31, 1997
  1. 1 with T. Urata

Naoto Sato (佐藤 直人 Satō Naoto?, born 1953) is a Japanese amateur astronomer and planetarian (a member of the professional staff of a planetarium). He has done much for the spread of astronomy in Japan through speaking on planetaria and the results of astronomical observation.

He supports ARISS (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station), which is a program that offers students an opportunity to experience the excitement of amateur radio by talking directly with crewmembers of the ISS (International Space Station).

Astronomy[edit]

Since 1995, he and his friend Takeshi Urata have discovered a large number of asteroids from Chichibu, Saitama Prefecture, including: 1995DJ2, Kamikochi, Azumino, Jonen, Iruma, and Sado. He has discovered so many asteroids that he is ranked among the top 50 asteroid discoverers in the world (The Astronomy Yearbook – 2008). The asteroid 6025 SATO-NAOTO, which Takeshi Urata discovered on December 30, 1992, was named after him.[1]

In 2001, while working as support staff at JK1ZAM, the club station of Iruma Children’s Center (an educational institution for children in Iruma City), he helped achieve the first ARISS school contact in Japan.

Also, in 2003, as a coordinating teacher, he helped accomplish the first solo contact between a junior high school in Japan and the ISS, with the support of JK1ZAM.

He regularly spoke on the astronomical talk program Sunset Café at the local radio station “FM CHAPPY 77.7” from December 2006 to November 2008.

He held the position of vice-director on the board of the Saitama Planetarium Liaison Council (2007-2008).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D.; Union, International Astronomical (2003), Dictionary of minor planet names (5 ed.), Springer, p. 504, ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3