Narco-capitalism

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Narco-capitalism (derivatives: narco-state, narco-economy) is a pejorative neologism meant to express criticism of a state's policies and practices surrounding the international illegal drug trade. The terms narco-capitalism and narco-state currently have no formal definition in official use and are not in the Oxford English Dictionary. It is a pejorative term meant to criticize and express disfavor about a government's drug policies; no state calls itself a narco-state as a neutral descriptor — thus, who uses the term, and in what context, is significant to understanding its intended meaning. Guinea-Bissau has been occasionally called a "narco-state" due to government officials often being bribed not to testify by drug lords in the country.[1] Additionally, "narco-capitalism has been used to denote how the pyschopharmacology of methamphetamine produces the precarious, risk-taking subjects typical of neoliberal late capitalism while favoring the commercial and regulatory interests of the pharmaceutical industry, i.e. the manufacturers of pseudoephedrine-based medicines and ADHD and related amphetamine medications.[2]

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  • (2002). Title of an online essay: "The Narco-State Cometh"[3]
  • (2006). An anonymous US official on Afghanistan: "Now what they have is a narco-economy. If they do not get corruption sorted they can slip into being a narco-state,".[4]

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