Nashville Christian Advocate

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The Nashville Christian Advocate was a weekly newspaper of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. It served as the central organ of the denomination as well as the official paper of the Tennessee Conference. [1] It was the largest and most influential of the Methodist newspapers in the South. It was founded under the name Southwestern Christian Advocate in 1836.[2] and remained the "leading weekly" of the church after the Civil War.[3] Prominent editors included Thomas Osgood Summers (1812-1882), Oscar Penn Fitzgerald and Elijah Embree Hoss.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sledge, Robert W. (1975). Hands on the Ark: The Struggle For Change in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South 1914-1939. p. 8. 
  2. ^ Frank Luther Mott, History of American Magazines, 1850-1865, vol. 2, p.68 n.97 (Harvard University Press, 1938). Excerpt available at Google Books.
  3. ^ Frank Luther Mott, History of American Magazines, 1865-1885, vol. 3, p.71 (Harvard University Press, 1938). Excerpt available at Google Books.
  4. ^ Horace Mellard Du Bose, Holland Nimmons McTyeire, A History of Methodism, pp.161-162 (Publishing house of the M. E. church, South, 1916). Excerpt available at Google Books.
  • Circuit Rider Dismounts: Social History of Southern Methodism, 1865-1900, by Hunter Dickinson Farish, 1938.
  • Hands on the Ark: The Struggle For Change in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1914-1939, by Robert Watson Sledge, 1975.
  • The Sacred Flame of Love: Methodism and Society in Nineteenth Century Georgia, by Christopher H. Owen (University Press of Georgia, 1999).
  • Rebuilding Zion: The Religious Reconstruction of the South, 1863-1877, by Daniel W. Stowell (Oxford University Press, 1998).
  • God's Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War, by George C. Rable (University of North Carolina Press, 2010).