Natalia Dudinskaya

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Natalia M. Dudinskaya as Söyembikä in the Jakobson/Yarullin Shuraleh, Leningrad, c. 1935

Natalia Mikhailovna Dudinskaya (21 August [O.S. 8 August] 1912, Kharkiv — 29 January 2003, Saint Petersburg) was a Russian prima ballerina who dominated the Kirov Ballet in the 1930s through 1950s.

Dudinskaya's mother was Natalia Tagliori, a ballerina coached by Enrico Cecchetti. Trained by Agrippina Vaganova, Dudinskaya matriculated from her school in 1931. She danced all the classical leads at the Kirov Theatre including the starring role in Cinderella. She later originated leading roles in Boris Asafyev's Flames of Paris and Taras Bulba. She was best known in Bayadere, Don Quixote and in the title role of Laurencia, which she originated. She was frequently partnered by her husband, Konstantin Sergeyev, famed Georgian dancer Vakhtang Chabukiani and, at the end of her career, a 21-year old Rudolf Nureyev who she picked to partner her in Laurencia. Frail health forced her to retire in 1961. She did, however dance in her husband's 1964 film version of Sleeping Beauty in the role of Carabosse. During her career, she received the total of four Stalin Prizes. In 1957, she was named a People's Artist of the USSR.

Upon her retirement, Dudinskaya became the ballet mistress of the Kirov Ballet and one of the most famed teachers at the Vaganova Institute. After Nureyev's defection to the West in 1961, she and her husband, Konstantin Sergeyev, were subjected to reprimands from Soviet officials. They ultimately lost their company positions after the defection of Natalia Makarova in 1970 but Dudinskaya continued to teach up and coming dancers. Anastasia Volochkova and Ulyana Lopatkina were among the last ballerinas coached by her. Dudinskaya also helped her husband stage his productions of Russian classics outside Russia, turning up at the Boston Ballet, for example, in the 1980s and '90s to work on "Giselle," "Swan Lake," "La Bayadere" and "Le Corsaire." She died in 2003 at the age of 90.

References[edit]

  • Movsheson A.G. Natalia Mikhailovna Dudinskaya. Leningrad, 1951.
  • G. Kremshevskaya. Natalya Dudinskaya. Leningrad-Moscow, 1964.

External links[edit]