Natalie Jane Prior

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Natalie Jane Prior
Born November 1963 (age 51)
Brisbane, Australia
Nationality Australian
Genre Children's literature, young-adult fiction
Website
www.nataliejaneprior.com/Home.php

Natalie Jane Prior is an Australian writer of children's literature and young-adult fiction.

Biography[edit]

Prior was born in 1963 in Brisbane, Australia, where she also currently lives with her husband and daughter.[1] Her first fiction book, The Amazing Adventures of Amabel, was published in 1990 and her internationally successful children's fantasy series, Lily Quench, has been published in more than twenty countries.[2] Prior's work has been a finalist at the Children's Book Council of Australia Awards as well as being honoured and named as notable.[2] Her work, Fireworks and Darkness, won the 2003 Davitt Awards for best young-adult novel and her work, Lily Quench and the Lighthouse of Skellig Mor won the 2003 Aurealis Award for best children's short fiction.[3][4] She has also been nominated for an Aurealis Award on three other occasions for best short fiction, long fiction and young-adult novel.[5]

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • The Amazing Adventures of Amabel (1990)
  • Amabel Abroad (1992)
  • Tasha's Witch (1995)
  • Yesterday's Heroes (1995)
  • West End Shuffle (1996)
  • London Calling (1997)
  • The Loft (1997)
  • Squish (2002)

Lily Quench

Main article: Lily Quench
  • Lily Quench And The Dragon Of Ashby (1999)
  • Lily Quench and the Black Mountains (2001)
  • Lily Quench and the Treasure of Mote Ely (2002)
  • Lily Quench and the Lighthouse Of Skellig Mor (2003)
  • Lily Quench and the Magician's Pyramid (2003)
  • Lily Quench and the Hand of Manuelo (2004, aka The Secret of Manuelo in the UK)
  • Lily Quench and the Search for King Dragon (2004)
  • Lily Quench's Companion: And Guide to Dragons and the Art of Quenching (2007)

The Ostermark novels

The Dolls

  • Fashion Follies (2005)
  • Susannah's Notebook (2005)
  • Horse Fever (2005)
  • Kiki's Caravan (2006)

The Minivers

  • Minivers On the Run (2008)
  • Minivers Fight Back (2009, known as Minivers in Danger in the UK)
  • Minivers and the Most Secret Room (2010, known as Minivers and the Secret Room in the UK)
  • Minivers Forever (2011; forthcoming)

Picture books[edit]

The Paw (with illustrator Terry Denton)

  • The Paw (1993)
  • The Paw in Destination: Brazil (1995)
  • The Paw in The Purple Diamond (1998)
  • The Paw Collection (2007, omnibus of the three books with new b/w artwork)

Other books

  • Minnie Pearl and the Undersea Bazaar (2007; illustrator Cheryl Orsini)
  • Star (2008; illustrator Anna Pignataro)
  • Sun (2008; illustrator Anna Pignataro)

Non fiction[edit]

  • Bog Bodies, Mummies and Curious Corpses (1994)
  • Mysterious Ruins, Lost Cities and Buried Treasure (1994)
  • Dance Crazy: Star Turns from Ballet to Belly Dancing (1995)
  • Caves, Graves, and Catacombs: Secrets from Beneath the Earth (1996)
  • The Demidenko Diary (1996)
  • Cleopatra: Last Queen of Egypt (1998)
  • Nero: Evil Emperor of Rome (1998)
  • Chewing Gum: How it Fed the Gods, Went into Space and Helped Win the War (2000)
  • The Recorder: How it Changed the World, Saved the Universe and Topped the Charts (2000)
  • Chocolate: How it Saved a Life, Built a City and Conquered the World (2000)
  • The Encyclopedia of Preserved People: Pickled, Frozen, and Mummified Corpses from Around the World (2002)

nataliejaneprior.com, [1]

Nominations and awards[edit]

Aurealis Awards

  • Best children's short fiction
    • 2003: Win: Lily Quench and the Lighthouse of Skellig Mor
    • 2003: Nomination: Lily Quench and the Magicians' Pyramid

Children's Book Council of Australia Awards

Davitt Awards

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About Natalie". nataliejaneprior.com. Retrieved 2010-10-24. 
  2. ^ a b "Natalie Jane Prior Homepage". Natalie Jane Prior. Retrieved 2010-10-24. 
  3. ^ "Davitt Awards 2003". Davitt Awards. Retrieved 2010-04-28. 
  4. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: 2004 Aurealis Awards". Locus Online. Retrieved 2010-04-28. 
  5. ^ "The Locus Index to SF Awards: Index of Literary Nominees". Locus Online. Retrieved 2010-04-28. 

External links[edit]