Nathan Seiberg

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Not to be confused with Atle Selberg.
Nathan Seiberg
Nathan Seiberg at Harvard cropped.jpg
Nathan Seiberg at Harvard University
Born (1956-09-22) September 22, 1956 (age 58)
Tel Aviv, Israel
Nationality Israeli American
Fields Theoretical physics
Institutions Institute for Advanced Study
Alma mater Weizmann Institute of Science, Tel-Aviv University
Doctoral advisor Haim Harari
Doctoral students Shiraz Minwalla
Known for Seiberg–Witten invariant
Seiberg duality
Notable awards MacArthur Fellow
Heineman Prize (1998)
Fundamental Physics Prize (2012)

Nathan "Nati" Seiberg (/ˈsbərɡ/; born September 22, 1956) is an Israeli American theoretical physicist who works on string theory. He is currently a professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, USA.

Research[edit]

His contributions to mathematical physics include:

  • Mathematical foundations of rational 2-dimensional CFTs (with G. Moore).
  • Discovery of some of the first examples of "Seiberg Duals", numerous and ever growing disparate theories that are dynamically equivalent to another at low energy
  • papers from the early 1990s about the application of holomorphy to calculations in gauge theories with supersymmetry, including a solution of N=1 four-dimensional gauge theories such as SQCD. He later used renormalization group methods to obtain a 3d Seiberg dual for his 4D SQCD
  • articles about the strong-weak duality (S-duality) in the context of supersymmetric gauge theories
  • papers about the complete solution of N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories in four and three dimensions
  • a paper on Matrix theory and M theory in the discrete Light-Cone Quantization
  • his and Edward Witten's analysis of the appearance of non-commutative geometry in theories containing open strings, and an identification of a low energy limit of open string dynamics as a noncommutative quantum field theory
  • OM-theory (with Andrew Strominger and Shiraz Minwalla)

Honors and awards[edit]

He was recipient of a 1996 MacArthur Fellowship[1] and the Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics in 1998.[2] In July 2012, he was an inaugural awardee of the Fundamental Physics Prize, the creation of physicist and internet entrepreneur, Yuri Milner.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]