Nathan Winograd

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Nathan J. Winograd is an American author, animal advocate, and director of the No Kill Advocacy Center in Oakland, California.

Biography[edit]

Winograd graduated from Stanford Law School, and then worked as a prosecutor and in corporate law. He came to public attention when he turned the rural Tompkins County shelter in upstate New York into a No-Kill shelter. Winograd headed the shelter in Tomkins County between 2001 and 2003. The euthanasia rate in Ithaca, New York was about half the United States average at the time of Winograd's hiring. During his two years there, the national rate of shelter euthanasia fell from 15.7 to 14.8 animals killed per one thousand humans. Winograd achieved a decline of 2.1.[1]

Winograd joined the San Francisco SPCA in 1994 and worked there until 2000. In 1994, the San Francisco SPCA, led by President Richard Avanzino (who later became the President of Maddie's Fund) along with the San Francisco Department of Animal Care and Control, guaranteed a home to every "adoptable" dog and cat who entered the shelter system.[2] Winograd joined the San Francisco SPCA in 1994 and worked there until 2000. At the time of Winograd's hiring, San Francisco had the lowest shelter euthanasia rate of any major city in the United States. The national rate of shelter killing dropped from 21.1 animals killed per one thousand humans to 16.8 (a decline of 4.3) during Winograd's time at the organization, 0.7 better than San Francisco.[3]

In a 2007 interview with Center for Consumer Freedom, Winograd said: "When San Francisco became the first city in the U.S. to save all healthy, homeless dogs and cats, and was effectively talking to the public about pet adoption, there was not a single pet store left in the city selling dogs and cats."[4]

Since the founding of the No-Kill Law and Advocacy Center, the rate of shelter euthanasia has declined from 14.8 to 9.5 animals per one thousand humans. However, impoundments of animals from no-kill shelters that could not stay open have doubled in the same time period, from about 2100 per year to more than 4200. [5]

Governance and Finances[edit]

Winograd received $60,000 in compensation during 2012.[6]

Books[edit]

  • Winograd, Nathan (2007). Redemption: The Myth of Pet Overpopulation and the No Kill Revolution in America. Almaden Books. ISBN 978-0-9790743-0-1. 
  • Winograd, Nathan (2009). Irreconcilable Differences: The Battle for the Heart & Soul of America's Animal Shelters. CreateSpace. ISBN 978-1-4495-9113-7. 
  • Winograd, Nathan (2011). All American Vegan: Veganism for the Rest of Us. Almaden Books. ISBN 978-0-9790743-3-2. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Animal People, 2013 Animal People Watchdog Report, 25, http://www.animalpeoplenews.org/watchdog_report.html
  2. ^ Animal Care and Control: Agreement between SFSPCA and ACC sfgov.org
  3. ^ Animal People, 2013 Animal People Watchdog Report, 25, http://www.animalpeoplenews.org/watchdog_report.html
  4. ^ Winograd, Nathan J. (2007-09-10). The Book HSUS and PETA Don’t Want You to Read. Interview with Center for Consumer Freedom. Archived from the original on 2012-03-27. Retrieved 2012-03-28. "When San Francisco became the first city in the U.S. to save all healthy, homeless dogs and cats, and was effectively talking to the public about pet adoption, there was not a single pet store left in the city selling dogs and cats." 
  5. ^ Animal People, 2013 Animal People Watchdog Report, 25, http://www.animalpeoplenews.org/watchdog_report.html
  6. ^ Animal People, 2013 Animal People Watchdog Report, 25, http://www.animalpeoplenews.org/watchdog_report.html

External links[edit]