Nathan Wolfe

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Nathan D. Wolfe
Nathan Wolfe 2011 Shankbone.JPG
Wolfe at the 2011 Time 100 gala
Born August 24, 1970
Detroit, Michigan
Residence San Francisco, California
Citizenship U.S.
Nationality U.S.
Fields Virology
Institutions Stanford
Alma mater Stanford, Harvard

Nathan D. Wolfe (born August 24, 1970) is an American virologist. He is currently Director of Global Viral [1] and the Lorry I. Lokey Visiting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University. Dr. Wolfe spent over eight years conducting biomedical research in both sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. In 2007, he founded Global Viral with the goal of developing an early warning system for pandemics to monitor the transmission of infectious diseases from animals to humans. The initiative currently coordinates a staff of over 100 scientists in China, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, DR Congo, Republic of the Congo, Laos, Gabon, Central African Republic, Malaysia, Madagascar and Sao Tome. He also directs Metabiota which offers both governmental and corporate services for biological threat evaluation and management.

Awards[edit]

Wolfe has been awarded more than $40 million in funding from a diverse array of sources including The U.S. Department of Defense, Google.org and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He is a Fulbright fellow and was awarded the prestigious NIH Director's Pioneer Award. Wolfe is currently a National Geographic Emerging Explorer and was named one of the World Economic Forum's Young Global Leaders. He was recognized as one of Popular Science's ‘Brilliant 10’ and Rolling Stone's ‘Top 100 Agents of Change.’ He serves on the editorial board of EcoHealth, Scientific American, and is a member of DARPA's Defense Science Research Council.

Press[edit]

Wolfe’s work has been published in and covered by the popular media including The New York Times and The Economist, Discover, and Scientific American. He has appeared on CNN, published in The New York Times and is a regular TED Presenter. He has also appeared as one of Time magazine's Time 100 for 2011.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Langreth, Robert. Finding the Next Epidemic Before It Kills. Forbes. 2 November 2009.

External links[edit]