Nathaniel Job Hammond

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Nathaniel Job Hammond (December 26, 1833 – April 20, 1899) was a jurist and politician from the American state of Georgia.

Hammond was born in Elbert County, Georgia . He graduated from the University of Georgia in Athens with a Bachelor of Arts in 1852. He was admitted to the state bar the next year and began praciticing law in Atlanta, Georgia.

In 1861, Hammond was elected as the solicitor general of the Atlanta circuit and served in that position until 1865. In 1867, he became reporter of the Supreme Court of Georgia and served in that capacity until 1872 when he became Georgia's attorney general (1872–1877). Hammond also served as a trustee of the University of Georgia beginning in 1871 and remained on the board until his death in 1899. He was Chairman his last few years of service and authored a book entitled The University of Georgia and the Constitution.

Hammond was a member and noted leader of the Georgia constitutional conventions in 1865 and 1877 that were tasked with creating a new state constitution.

In 1878, Hammond won election to the United States House of Representatives and was re-elected for three more terms (1880, 1882, and 1884) before losing his seat in 1886. Hammond resumed his career as a lawyer and died in Atlanta in 1899 and was buried in that city's Oakland Cemetery.

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Milton A. Candler
U.S. Representative of Georgia's 5th Congressional District
March 4, 1879 – March 3, 1887
Succeeded by
John D. Stewart

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