National Aboriginal Achievement Awards

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The National Aboriginal Achievement Awards (NAAA) are annual awards presented by the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation in Canada. The awards are intended to celebrate and encourage excellence in the Aboriginal community.

About[edit]

The awards were first established in 1993 in conjunction with the United Nations declared International Decade of the World's Indigenous peoples. The awards are intended to celebrate and encourage excellence in the Aboriginal community.[1] Awards may be presented in a variety of categories, depending on the particular achievements of Aboriginal people in the nominating period — 14 awards are presented each year including one for Lifetime Achievement and a Special Youth Award that comes with a cash prize of $10,000 and 12 career categories with not all individual career categories necessarily presented annually.[2] To be eligible an individual must be of either First Nations, Inuit, or Métis heritage. Additionally they must demonstrate outstanding career achievement, and be a permanent Canadian resident or be Canadian born. The awards are broadcast annually on the Global Television Network and the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN). Since 1985 the Foundation through its Education Program has awarded more than $32-million in scholarships and bursaries to more than 8,400 First Nations, Inuit and Métis students nationwide.[1]

Eligibility Criteria[edit]

Individuals of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis ancestry who have reached a significant level of achievement in their respective occupations are eligible for nomination. Any person may nominate a candidate they deem to be worthy of this recognition with reference to the following criteria:[1]

  • Of First Nations, Inuit or Métis heritage
  • Who demonstrate outstanding career achievement
  • Of any age with the exception of the youth category
  • Permanent Canadian Resident or Canadian born
  • Youth achiever nominees must be 15–27 years of age[3]

National Aboriginal achievement awards recipients[edit]

Each year 14 recipients are recognized for their outstanding accomplishments in various disciplines ranging from health, law, political science, culture, arts, and others, two of which are specific recognition to one outstanding youth achiever and one lifetime achievement recipient. The awards are recognized both nationally and internationally as one of the highest honours the community can bestow upon its own achievers.[4]

2014[edit]

  • Charlie Snowshoe – Environment & Natural Resources
  • Christie Lavallée – Youth – Métis
  • Evan Tlesla II Adams – Health
  • Grand Chief Stewart Philip – Politics
  • James Eetoolook – Lifetime Achievement
  • John Nicholas Jeddore – Youth – First Nation
  • Kent Monkman – Arts
  • Maggie Paul – Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Marie Yvonne Delorme – Business & Commerce
  • Marion Meadmore – Law & Justice
  • Mary Spencer – Sports
  • Rita Bouvier – Education
  • Robert Watts – Public Service
  • Sarah Arngna’naaq – Youth – Inuit

2013[edit]

  • Alex Van Bibber – Lifetime Achievement
  • Charlie Evalik – Business & Commerce
  • Duane Smith – Politics
  • Elizabeth Zarpa – Youth - Inuit
  • Gabrielle Scrimshaw – Youth - First Nation
  • Gail Cyr – Public Service
  • Graham Kotowich – Youth - Métis
  • Jacqueline Guest – Arts
  • Lloyd (Sonny) Flett – Environment & Natural Resources
  • Ruby Jacobs – Health
  • Shawn A-in-chut Atleo – Education
  • Theoren Fleury – Sports
  • Viola Robinson – Law & Justice
  • Winston Wuttunee – Culture, Heritage & Spirituality

2012[edit]

  • Adam Beach - Arts
  • Victor S. Buffalo - Business & Commerce
  • Dave Courchene - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Leona Makokis - Education
  • Richard Stewart Hardy - Environment & Natural Resources
  • Dr. Janet Smylie - Health
  • Violet Ford - Law & Justice
  • Senator Gerry St. Germain - Lifetime
  • Richard Wagamese - Media & Communications
  • The Honourable Leona Aglukkaq - Politics
  • Grand Chief Edward John - Politics
  • Minnie Grey - Public Service
  • Richard Peter - Sports
  • Earl Cook - Youth
  • Candace Sutherland - Youth

2011[edit]

  • Corrine Hunt - Arts
  • Joseph F. Dion - Business & Commerce
  • Paingut Annie Peterloosie - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Dr. Margo L. Greenwood - Education
  • Ronald Edward Sparrow - Environment & Natural Resources
  • Dr. Marcia Anderson DeCoteau - Health
  • Roger Jones - Law & Justice
  • Dr. Lillian McGregor - Lifetime
  • Jean LaRose - Media & Communications
  • Audrey Poitras - Politics
  • Cindy Blackstock - Public Service
  • Teyotsihstokwáthe Dakota Brant - Special Youth
  • Frederick G. Sasakamoose - Sports
  • Dr. Duncan Cree - Technology & Trades

2010[edit]

  • Kananginak Pootoogook - Arts
  • Ellen Melcosky - Business & Commerce
  • Tom Crane Bear - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Raoul J. McKay - Education
  • Danny Beaton - Environment and Natural Resources
  • Madeleine Kētēskwew Dion Stout - Health
  • Donald Worme - Law & Justice
  • William Commanda - Lifetime
  • Kenneth Atsenhaienton Deer - Media & Communication
  • Eric Robinson - Politics
  • Edith Cloutier - Public Service
  • Skawenniio Barnes - Special Youth
  • Monica Pinette - Sports
  • Doug Henry - Technology & Trades

2009[edit]

  • Melanie Jackson - Arts
  • Dennis Jackson - Arts
  • Allan C. McLeod - Business & Commerce
  • Stephen J. Augustine - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Cecil King - Education
  • Gordon W. Prest - Environment and Natural Resources
  • Candace Grier-Lowe - Health
  • Delia Opekokew - Law & Justice
  • Stan Cuthand - Lifetime Achievement
  • Carol Morin - Media & Communication
  • Paul Okalik - Politics
  • Joan Glode - Public Service
  • Chelsea Lavallée - Special Youth
  • Adam Sioui - Sports
  • Mervin J. Dewasha - Technology & Trades

2008[edit]

  • Shirley Cheechoo - Arts
  • Jim Boucher - Business & Commerce
  • Hubert Skye - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Marie Ann Battiste - Education
  • Elizabeth (Tshaukuesh) Penashue - Environment and Natural Resources
  • Jeff Reading - Health
  • David C. Nahwegahbow - Law & Justice
  • Norval Morrisseau - Lifetime Achievement
  • Paul Andrew - Media & Communication
  • Joe Handley - Politics
  • Sylvia B. Maracle - Public Service
  • Boyd Wesley Benjamin - Special Youth
  • Reggie Leach - Sports

2007[edit]

  • Joane Cardinal-Schubert - Arts
  • Jack Poole - Business & Commerce
  • Alestine Andre - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Joe Michel - Education
  • David Walkem - Environment and Natural Resources
  • Joseph Couture - Health
  • Hugh Braker - Law & Justice
  • Bertha Clark Jones - Lifetime Achievement
  • Lisa Meeches - Media & Communication
  • Fred Carmichael - Politics
  • Lewis Cardinal - Public Service
  • James Makokis - Special Youth
  • Wegadesk Gorup-Paul - Sports
  • Monica Peters - Technology & Trades

2006[edit]

  • Jane Ash Poitras - Arts
  • Bernd Christmas - Business & Commerce
  • Wendy Grant-John - Community Development
  • Gladys Taylor Cook - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Taiaiake (Gerald) Alfred - Education
  • Billy Day - Environment and Natural Resources
  • Herb Belcourt - Housing
  • James (Sakej) Youngblood Henderson - Law & Justice
  • Jim Sinclair - Lifetime Achievement
  • Myra Cree - Media & Communication
  • George Tuccaro - Media & Communication
  • Tony Belcourt - Public Service
  • Andrea Dykstra - Special Youth
  • Shirley Firth Larsson - Sports

2005[edit]

  • Joe Jacobs - Arts
  • Gerald McMaster - Arts
  • Douglas Golosky - Business & Commerce
  • Judy Gingell - Community Development
  • Dr. John Joe Sark - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Eber Hampton - Education
  • Emma LaRocque - Education
  • Andy Carpenter Sr. - Environment and Natural Resources
  • Thomas Dignan - Health
  • Bertha Allen - Lifetime Achievement
  • Brenda Chambers - Media & Communication
  • Lolly Annahatak - Social Services
  • Fauna Kingdon - Special Youth
  • Sharon Anne Firth - Sports

2004[edit]

  • Tina Keeper - Arts
  • Susan Point - Arts
  • Osuitok Ipeelee - Arts
  • Clarence Louie - Business & Commerce
  • Basil Johnston - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Carl Urion - Education
  • Sheila Watt-Cloutier - Environment and Natural Resources
  • Muriel Stanley Venne - Law & Justice
  • Andrew T. Delisle, Sr. - Lifetime Achievement
  • Suzanne Rochon Burnett - Media & Communication
  • Pearl Calahasen - Public Service
  • Lee Wilson - Science and Technology
  • Kristinn Frederickson - Special Youth

2003[edit]

  • John Arcand - Arts
  • Tom King - Arts
  • Mel E. Benson - Business & Commerce
  • Gary Bosgoed - Business & Commerce
  • Mary Richard - Community Development
  • Charles Edward Lennie - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Leroy Little Bear - Education
  • Simon Lucas - Environment and Natural Resources
  • Judith Bartlett - Health
  • Jay Wortman - Health
  • John J. Borrows - Law & Justice
  • Robbie Robertson - Lifetime Achievement
  • Sophie Pierre - Public Service
  • Matthew Dunn - Special Youth

2002[edit]

  • Ohito Ashoona - Arts
  • Frieda Diesing - Arts
  • Harry Deneron - Business & Commerce
  • Leonard (Len) G. Flett - Business & Commerce
  • George Kurszewski - Community Development
  • Noel Knockwood - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Roy Fox - Energy
  • Gilles Pinette - Health
  • Alex Janvier - Lifetime Achievement
  • Gail Gutherie Valaskakis - Media & Communication
  • Jonah Kelly - Media & Communication
  • Joseph Tokwiro Norton - Public Service
  • Jordin Tootoo - Special Youth
  • Michael Nepinak - Sports

2001[edit]

  • Tomson Highway - Arts
  • Dolly Watts - Business & Commerce
  • Fred House - Community Development
  • Mariano Aupilardjuk - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Freda Ahenakew - Education
  • Mary Thomas - Environment and Natural Resources
  • Lindsay Crowshoe - Health
  • Harold Cardinal - Lifetime Achievement
  • Roman Bittman - Media & Communication It isn't hard to gauge the impact Roman Bittman had on life in Canada. Just turn on your television. You'll see shows written,directed, produced and shot in Canada; Hollywood productions that now employ and challenge Canadians from coast to coast to coast; and finally, a television network that Aboriginal Canadians can truly call their own. That's the legacy of Roman Bittman, a trapper's son who was born in Fort Vermilion, just south of the boarder between the Northwest Territories and Alberta. At high school in Hay River, NWT, Mr. Bittman was in the thick of amateur efforts that ensured sub-arctic listeners had a welcome break from the only radio their dial then offered - Radio Moscow. Winning a scholarship, Mr. Bittman headed south to Toronto and studied at Ryerson, graduating in the mid-60's. He worked at CBC TV News and was soon one of the founding group of producers of The Nature of Things, CBC TV's flagship natural history and science series. Since then, behind the camera and in the studio, he has been responsible for upwards of 100 films. More than 30 of them were among the highest rated on Canadian television. Mr. Bittman also became President of the Nova Scotia Film Development Corporation and designed and implemented the Film Industry Labour Tax Credit there, - a first for English Canada.It has now been emulated across the country and around the world and is considered the main financial instrument fueling the explosive growth in the Canadian film industry. Now an executive with Visual Bible International, Mr. Bittman was an advisor and founding board member of APTN, the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network.
  • Zacharias Kunuk - Media & Communication
  • Leonard Marchand - Public Service
  • Richard Nerysoo - Public Service
  • Nick Sibbeston - Public Service
  • Lance Relland - Special Youth

2000[edit]

  • Art Thompson - Arts
  • John Charles Bernard - Business & Commerce
  • Roy Albert Whitney - Business & Commerce
  • Paul J. Birckel - Community Development
  • Simon Baker - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Edith Josie - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Jo-Ann Archibald - Education
  • Miles G. Richardson - Environment and Natural Resources
  • Fjola Hart-Wasekeesikaw - Health
  • Steven Point - Law & Justice
  • Joseph Arthur Gosnell - Lifetime Achievement
  • Leetia Ineak - Media & Communication
  • Konrad Haskan Sioui - Public Service
  • Waneek Horn-Miller - Special Youth

1999[edit]

  • Dorothy Grant - Business & Commerce
  • David Gabriel Tuccaro - Business & Commerce
  • Dorothy Betz - Community Development
  • Theresa Stevenson - Community Development
  • Mitiarjuk Attasie Nappaaluk - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Howard Adams - Education
  • Malcolm King - Health
  • Edward Kantonkote Cree - Health
  • James Igloliorte - Law & Justice
  • Rose Toodick Boyko - Law & Justice
  • Allen Sapp - Lifetime Achievement
  • James Bartleman - Public Service
  • Lillian Dyck - Science
  • Alika LaFontaine - Youth

1998[edit]

1997[edit]

  • Kiawak Ashoona - Arts
  • Gil Cardinal - Arts
  • Graham Greene - Arts
  • Rita Joe - Arts
  • Billy Diamond - Business & Commerce
  • Charlie Watt - Community Development
  • Stanley John McKay - Culture, Heritage & Spirituality
  • Martin Gale McLoughlin - Health
  • Chester R. Cunningham - Law & Justice
  • Harry S. LaForme - Law & Justice
  • Olive Dickason - Lifetime Achievement
  • Stephen Kakfwi - Public Service
  • George Berthe - Special Youth
  • Darren Zack - Sports

1996[edit]

1995[edit]

  • Douglas Cardinal - Architecture
  • Robert Davidson - Arts and Culture
  • Frank Hansen - Business and Culture
  • Chief Louis Stevenson - Community Development
  • Ernest Benedict - Education
  • Marie Smallface Marule - Education
  • Ahab Spence - Education
  • Matthew Coon Come - Environment and Public Service
  • Maggie Hodgson - Health Services
  • Alfred Scow - Law and Justice
  • Kenojuak Ashevak - Lifetime Achievement
  • Noah Carpenter - Medicine
  • Sharla Tiakohatéhkwen Howard - Special Youth

1994[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "About NAAF". National Aboriginal Achievement Awards. Retrieved 2009-12-02. 
  2. ^ "National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation Financial Report". Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. Retrieved 2009-12-02. 
  3. ^ https://indspire.ca/indspire-awards/nominate-an-achiever/
  4. ^ "Lawyer among National Aboriginal Achievement Award winners". The Law Society of Upper Canada. Retrieved 2009-12-02. 

External links[edit]