National Alliance to End Homelessness

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
National Alliance to End Homelessness
Founded 1987
Focus Ending homelessness through policy advocacy, research, and capacity building.
Location
  • Washington, D.C.
Website [1]

The National Alliance to End Homelessness is a United States based organization addressing the issue of homelessness. The Alliance provides data and research to policymakers and elected officials in order to inform policy debates. They also work on the local level provide community partners with information on best practices and technical assistance.[1]

In March 2011, the Alliance partnered with 26 leaders from Australia, Canada, the European Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States to create an International Alliance to End Homelessness.[2]

Founding and Structure[edit]

In 1983, the National Citizens Committee for Food and Shelter was established to meet the emergency needs of the homeless population. In 1987, the Committee determined that a more comprehensive approach was necessary and created the National Alliance to End Homelessness.[1]

The current President and CEO is Nan Roman. Ms. Roman works with the Board of Directors and the Alliance's staff to execute its mission. Current members of the Board include Susan Baker, Co-Founder,Elizabeth Boyle, Co-Founder; Mike Lowry, Gary M. Parsons, Robert Villency, President Nan Roman, Henry Cisneros, Stephen Coyle, Kenneth M. Duberstein, Jeffery Hayward, G. Allan Kingston, The Honorable John J. LaPalce, Tim Marx, Irene Mabry Moses, D. William Moreau, Norman B. Rice, Michael R. Steed, Robert D. Stillman, and Judy Woodruff.[3]

In addition to its board and staff, the Alliance partners with over 10,000 public agencies and community providers.

In 2000 Ms. Roman launched A Plan, Not a Dream: How to End Homelessness in Ten Years, – a revolutionary nationwide initiative that provided a step-by-step community-based plan to end homelessness in a decade.[4] By 2010, there are 234 completed plans to end homelessness across the United States.[5]

Charity Watch rates the National Alliance to End Homelessness an "A+".[6]Ending Homelessness Through Public Policy: Nan Roman, CEO of the National Alliance to End Homelessness

When Nan Roman first worked for the Institute for Poverty Studies, the concept of homelessness was not discussed. There was a phenomenon called "residential displacement" and there was a concern that "if we keep tearing down all this affordable housing and converting apartments into condos and co-ops, there won’t be enough housing for low-income people." At the time the federal government was not concerned because they believed "widespread homelessness would never be accepted in the U.S." She later turned her focus to alleviating poverty by impacting public policy.[7] Ms. Roman is a valued resource person for the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness(USICH)[8]

Publications[edit]

The Homelessness Research Institute (HRI), the research branch of the Alliance, publishes an annual report, the State of Homelessness in America [9][10]

Definition of homelessness[edit]

The Homelessness Research Institute (HRI), the research arm of the National Alliance to End Homelessness uses the definition for "homelessness" or "homeless" set by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), which considers an individual homeless if he or she lives in an emergency shelter, transitional housing program, safe haven, or a place not meant for human habitation, such as a car, abandoned buildings, or on the street. Continuums of Care (CoCs) are the local or regional planning bodies that coordinate services and funding for individuals and families experiencing homelessness."[10]


Conferences[edit]

The Alliance hosts two conferences, the National Conference on Ending Homelessness and the National Conference on Ending Family and Youth Homelessness [11][12]

Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness[edit]

In 2012 the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness was formed with Alex Himelfarb as the Chair, Tim Richter as Vice- Chair and Stephen Gaetz as secretary. Their objectives are similar to those National Alliance to End Homelessness, and they are actively supporting 10-year plans in Canada. In 2008 Alberta became the first Canadian province to adopt a 10-year plan with its two major cities, Calgary and Edmonton. Other cities soon followed.[13] As President and CEO of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, Tim Richter led the implementation of Calgary, Alberta's 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness from 2008 to 2012 which included the introduction of the Housing First program including the Pathways to Housing program.[14]

External links[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About us". National Alliance to End Homelessness. Washington, DC. 2014. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  2. ^ Roman, Nan; Poppe, Barbara (April 5, 2011). "International Leaders Create Alliance to End Homelessness". Retrieved 11 February 2014. 
  3. ^ "About us". National Alliance to End Homelessness. Washington, DC. 2014. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  4. ^ "A Plan, Not a Dream: How to End Homelessness in Ten Years". National Alliance to End Homelessness. 2000. Retrieved February 11, 2014. 
  5. ^ Roman, Nan (January 28, 2010). "After 10 Years, Plan to End Homelessness Has Way to Go". Retrieved February 11, 2014. 
  6. ^ Charity Rating Guide and Watchdog Report, Volume Number 59, December 2011
  7. ^ Hayes, Cali (August 10, 2010). "Nan Roman, CEO of the National Alliance to End Homelessness". Retrieved February 11, 2014. 
  8. ^ (PDF) Opening Doors: federal strategic plan to prevent and end homelessness: update 2011 (Report). http://usich.gov/resources/uploads/USICH_FSPUpdate_2012_12312.pdf. Retrieved February 11, 2014.
  9. ^ Giraud, Jean-Michel (April 20, 2013). "State Of Homelessness in America 2013 Unveiled By NAEH". Huffington Post. Retrieved February 11, 2014. 
  10. ^ a b "State of Homelessness in America" (PDF). Homelessness Research Institute (HRI). 2013. http://documents.lahsa.org/Communication/pressrelease/2013/NAEH_State_of_Homeleness_in_America_2013.pdf. Retrieved February 11, 2014.
  11. ^ http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/07/prweb4237584.htm
  12. ^ http://www.usich.gov/media_center/blog/the_national_conference_to_end_family_and_youth_homelessness_and_the_work_o/
  13. ^ "About CAEH". Toronto, Ontario. 2014. Retrieved 11 February 2014. 
  14. ^ , Calgary Homeless Foundation, 2014 http://calgaryhomeless.com/about-us/leadership/tim-richter/, retrieved February 11, 2014  Missing or empty |title= (help)


References[edit]