National Ambassador for Young People's Literature

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National Ambassador for Young People's Literature is a literary honor presented bi-annually by the Library of Congress to an author or illustrator who is a U.S. citizen and who has made a substantial contribution to young people's literature.[1] The position was established in 2008. More than receiving an award, during their tenure ambassadors help communicate to children about books and reading, so the selection criteria include being an effective communicator, having a dynamic personality and the ability to work with children.[1] The position is modeled in part on the British Children's Laureate, which was established in 1999.[citation needed] The position is currently sponsored by the Center for the Book and the Children's Book Council.

Honorees[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About". National Ambassador for Young People's Literature (NAYPL). Library of Congress (LC).
  2. ^ a b "Emeritus". NAYPL. LC. Retrieved July 23, 2013.
  3. ^ Motoko Rich (January 3, 2008). "Stinky Cheese! Ambassador for Children’s Literature". The New York Times. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  4. ^ Bob Thompson (January 3, 2008). "Popular Children's Author Named Reading Ambassador". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  5. ^ David Montgomery (January 6, 2010). "Katherine Paterson named National Ambassador for Young People's Literature". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  6. ^ Motoko Rich (January 4, 2010). "New Envoy's Old Advice for Children: Read More". The New York Times. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Ambassador". NAYPL. LC. Retrieved July 23, 2013.
  8. ^ Janice D'Arcy (January 16, 2012). "Walter Dean Myers, the National Ambassador for Young People's Literature, on raising readers". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  9. ^ Julie Bosman (January 3, 2012). "Children's Book Envoy Defines His Mission". The New York Times. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  10. ^ Julie Bosman (January 2, 2014). "Newbery Winner to Promote Her Genre". New York Times. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  11. ^ Sue Corbett (January 2, 2014). "Kate DiCamillo Named Next National Ambassador for Young People's Literature". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  12. ^ Monica Hesse (January 2, 2014). "Kate DiCamillo, author of ‘Because of Winn Dixie,’ named children’s literature ambassador". Washington Post. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 

External links[edit]