National Asian American Survey

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National Asian American Survey is a nonpartisan organization that conducts representative surveys of the political and social preferences of the Asian American and Pacific Islander population in the United States.

Research is conducted by Professor Karthick Ramakrishnan of University of California, Riverside and Professor Taeku Lee of University of California, Berkeley.

Surveys[edit]

2008 National Asian American Survey[edit]

The 2008 survey polled 5,159 Asian Americans between August and October 2008, in English and 7 Asian languages, and reported data on Chinese Americans, Filipino Americans, Indian Americans, Japanese Americans, Korean Americans, and Vietnamese Americans. Most of the questions related to partisanship, political participation, and civic participation.[1]

2012 National Asian American Survey[edit]

The 2012 survey polled 4,269 Asian Americans and 486 Pacific Islanders between July and October 2012, in English and 10 Asian languages, and reported data on Chinese Americans, Filipino Americans, Hmong Americans, Indian Americans, Japanese Americans, Korean Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Vietnamese Americans. Questions included partisanship, political participation, and opinions on specific policy issues including immigration policy and the budget deficit.[2] Among other things, the respondents were strong supporters of the Affordable Care act,[3] and visa backlogs were a significant concern among Asian American voters.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2008 National Asian American Survey". Presentation. National Asian American Survey. Retrieved 8 May 2013. 
  2. ^ "Opinions Of Asian Americans And Pacific Islanders: Deficit Reduction, Economic Priorities, And The Federal Budget". Report. National Asian American Survey. Retrieved 8 May 2013. 
  3. ^ "Sin City Republican Woos Asian American Vote to Curb Defections". Article. Bloomberg. Retrieved 11 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "For Asian-Americans, Immigration Backlogs are a major hurdle". Article. NPR. Retrieved 11 July 2013.