National Book Award for Poetry

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The National Book Award for Poetry is one of four annual National Book Awards, which are given by the National Book Foundation to recognize outstanding literary work by US citizens. They are awards "by writers to writers".[1] The panelists are five "writers who are known to be doing great work in their genre or field".[2]

The category Poetry was established in 1950 and has been annual except for no award 1985 to 1990.[3]

The award recognizes one book written by a US citizen and published in the US from December 1 to November 30. The National Book Foundation accepts nominations from publishers until June 15, requires mailing nominated books to the panelists by August 1, and announces five finalists in October. The winner is announced on the day of the final ceremony in November. The award is $10,000 and a bronze sculpture; other finalists get $1000, a medal, and a citation written by the panel.[4]

There were 148 nominations for the 2010 award.[5]

Current rendition[edit]

The longlist will be announced in September 2014.

Winners[edit]

The winner is listed first followed by the four other finalists (from 1987) or other runners up.

2010–2019[6]
2013[7][8] Mary Szybist Incarnadine
Frank Bidart Metaphysical Dog
Lucie Brock-Broido Stay, Illusion
Adrian Matejka The Big Smoke
Matt Rasmussen Black Aperture
2012[9] David Ferry Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations[10][11]
Susan Wheeler Meme
Cynthia Huntington Heavenly Bodies
Tim Seibles Fast Animal
Alan Shapiro Night of the Republic
2011 Nikky Finney Head Off & Split: Poems
Yusef Komunyakaa The Chameleon Couch
Carl Phillips Double Shadow
Adrienne Rich Tonight No Poetry Will Serve: Poems: 2007-2010
Bruce Smith Devotions
2010 Terrance Hayes Lighthead
Kathleen Graber The Eternal City
James Richardson By the Numbers
C.D. Wright One with Others
Monica Youn Ignatz
2000-09[12]
2009 Keith Waldrop Transcendental Studies: A Trilogy
Rae Armantrout Versed
Ann Lauterbach Or to Begin Again
Carl Phillips Speak Low
Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon Open Interval
2008 Mark Doty Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems
2007 Robert Hass Time and Materials: Poems, 1997–2005
2006 Nathaniel Mackey Splay Anthem
2005 W. S. Merwin Migration: New and Selected Poems
2004 Jean Valentine Door in the Mountain: New and Collected Poems, 1965-2003
2003 C. K. Williams The Singing
2002 Ruth Stone In the Next Galaxy
2001 Alan Dugan Poems Seven: New and Complete Poetry (vol 7 of seven)
2000 Lucille Clifton Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems 1988–2000
1991–99[13]
1999 Ai Vice: New and Selected Poems
1998 Gerald Stern This Time: New and Selected Poems
1997 William Meredith Effort at Speech: New and Selected Poems
1996 Hayden Carruth Scrambled Eggs & Whiskey: Poems, 1991–1995
1995 Stanley Kunitz Passing Through: The Later Poems, New and Selected
1994 James Tate The Worshipful Company of Fletchers: Poems
1993 A. R. Ammons Garbage
1992 Mary Oliver New and Selected Poems (vol 1 of two)
1991 Philip Levine What Work Is
Andrew Hudgins The Never-Ending
Linda McCarriston Eva-Mary
Adrienne Rich An Atlas of the Difficult World: Poems 1988-1991
Marilyn Nelson Waniek The Homeplace: Poems
1990
1989
1988
1987 The Poetry award and many others were eliminated from the program when it was revamped in 1984. It was restored in 1991, now for current-year publications, with a standard five finalists announced a few weeks prior to the main event.
1986
1985
1984
1980–83[14]
1983
[a]
Charles Wright Country Music: Selected Early Poems
1983 Galway Kinnell Selected Poems
1982 William Bronk Life Supports: New and Collected Poems
1981 Lisel Mueller The Need to Hold Still: Poems
1980 Philip Levine Ashes: Poems New and Old
1970–79[15]
1979 James Merrill Mirabell: Books of Number
1978 Howard Nemerov The Collected Poems of Howard Nemerov
1977 Richard Eberhart Collected Poems, 1930-1976: including 43 new poems
1976 John Ashbery Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror
1975 Marilyn Hacker Presentation Piece
1974
[a]
Adrienne Rich Diving into the Wreck: Poems, 1971-1972
1974 Allen Ginsberg The Fall of America: Poems of These States, 1965-1971
1973 A. R. Ammons Collected Poems, 1951-1971
1972
[a]
Howard Moss Selected Poems
1972 Frank O'Hara The Collected Poems of Frank O'Hara (posth.)
1971 Mona Van Duyn To See, To Take: Poems
1970 Elizabeth Bishop The Complete Poems
1960–69[16]
1969 John Berryman His Toy, His Dream, His Rest
1968 Robert Bly The Light Around the Body
1967 James Merrill Nights and Days
1966 James Dickey Buckdancer's Choice: Poems
1965 Theodore Roethke The Far Field (posth.)
1964 John Crowe Ransom Selected Poems
1963 William Stafford Traveling Through the Dark
1962 Alan Dugan Poems (vol 1 of seven)
1961 Randall Jarrell The Woman at the Washington Zoo: Poems and Translations
1960 Robert Lowell Life Studies
1950–59[17]
1959 Theodore Roethke Words for the Wind: Poems of Theodore Roethke
1958 Robert Penn Warren Promises: Poems, 1954-1956
1957 Richard Wilbur Things of This World
1956 W. H. Auden The Shield of Achilles
1955 Wallace Stevens The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens
1954 Conrad Aiken Collected Poems
1953 Archibald MacLeish Collected Poems, 1917-1952
1952 Marianne Moore Collected Poems
1951 Wallace Stevens The Auroras of Autumn
1950 William Carlos Williams   Paterson: Book Three and Selected Poems (two books)[18]
No runners up.[18][19]

Repeat winners[edit]

See Winners of multiple U.S. National Book Awards

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The Poetry panels split the 1972, 1974, and 1983 awards. Split awards have been prohibited continuously from 1984 (and the same reform eliminated the Poetry category, restored 1992).

References[edit]

  1. ^ "History of the National Book Awards". National Book Foundation (NBF): About Us. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  2. ^ "How the National Book Awards Work". NBF: Awards. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  3. ^ "National Book Award Winners: 1950 – 2009". NBF: Awards. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  4. ^ "National Book Award Selection Process". NBF: Awards. Retrieved 2011-11-17.
  5. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions". NBF: About Us. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  6. ^ "National Book Awards – 2010". NBF. Retrieved 2012-04-01. (Select 2010 or a later year from the top left menu.)
  7. ^ "2013 National Book Award Finalists Announced". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  8. ^ "2013 National Book Awards". NBF. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  9. ^ "National Book Award Finalists Announced Today". Library Journal. October 10, 2012. Retrieved 2012-11-15. 
  10. ^ "2012 National Book Awards Go to Erdrich, Boo, Ferry, Alexander". Publisher's Weekly. Retrieved 2012-11-15. 
  11. ^ Leslie Kaufman (November 14, 2012). "Novel About Racial Injustice Wins National Book Award". New York Times. Retrieved 2012-11-15. 
  12. ^ "National Book Awards – 2000". NBF. Retrieved 2012-04-01. (Select 2000 to 2009 from the top left menu.)
  13. ^ "National Book Awards – 1990". NBF. Retrieved 2012-04-01. (Select 1990 to 1999 from the top left menu.)
  14. ^ "National Book Awards – 1980". NBF. Retrieved 2012-04-01. (Select 1980 to 1983 from the top left menu.)
  15. ^ "National Book Awards – 1970". NBF. Retrieved 2012-04-01. (Select 1970 to 1979 from the top left menu.)
  16. ^ "National Book Awards – 1960". NBF. Retrieved 2012-04-01. (Select 1960 to 1969 from the top left menu.)
  17. ^ "National Book Awards – 1950". NBF. Retrieved 2012-04-01. (Select 1950 to 1959 from the top left menu.)
  18. ^ a b "National Book Awards – 1950". NBF. Retrieved 2012-02-25.
    (With essays by Neil Baldwin and Ross Gay from the Awards 50-year print publication(?) and 60-year anniversary blog. Baldwin covers the award-sharing book: "The edition of the Selected Poems brought out in 1949 has of necessity over the past half-century been emended and expanded many times. ...")
  19. ^ At the first awards dinner in the currently recognized series, there were five honorable mentions announced in the non-fiction category only.
    • "Book Publishers Make 3 Awards: ... Gold Plaques", The New York Times, March 17, 1950, page 21.