National Coalition of 100 Black Women

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National Coalition of 100 Black Women
National Coalition of 100 Black Women logo.png
Abbreviation NCBW
Formation October 24, 1981; 32 years ago (1981-10-24)
Type Nonprofit organization (501(c)(4))
Headquarters New York, New York
President M. DeLois Strum
Affiliations National Coalition of 100 Black Women/Community Services Fund
Website ncbw.org

The National Coalition of 100 Black Women (NCBW) is a non-profit volunteer organization for American women. Its members address common issues in their communities, families and personal lives, promoting gender and racial equity.

The organization has its roots in the Coalition of 100 Black Women, founded in New York City in 1970 by Edna Beach and 23 other African American women.[1] The organization takes its name from 100 Black Men of America.[2] Jewell Jackson McCabe, one of the original founders, became President of the New York chapter in 1977 and set out to create a national coalition. Within ten months, the organization had 37 chapters in 20 states.[3] By 1981, the organization had grown to over 500 members, gaining local and national media recognition. They worked with other chapters and women leaders across the United States to form the NCBW. In October 24, 1981, after returning from the National Conference of Black Mayors, it was determined it was imperative to formally extend the institution beyond New York City. As a result, the word "National" was incorporated into the organization's name. NCBW became a not-for-profit organization with representatives from fourteen states and the District of Columbia. By 1986, there were three thousand members in nineteen states, with forty-seven chapters altogether. In 1998, the advocacy agenda of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women expanded to include other women of color.[1]

The National Coalition of 100 Black Women has thousands of members with sixty chapters across twenty five states and the District of Columbia. Each aspiring to meet the needs of its members, empower Black women, and promote racial equality.[1] Their programs and meetings address diverse issues through the National Coalition of 100 Black Women/Community Services Fund.[4]

The National Coalition of 100 Black Women bestows Candace Women of Achievement Awards to women of minority descent that have made valuable contributions to their communities. The award is named for Candace, the title for queens and queen mothers of the ancient African Kingdom of Kush.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Our History". National Coalition of 100 Black Women. Retrieved June 16, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Black women sending 'signal of strength'". The Pittsburgh Press. October 13, 1984. 
  3. ^ a b Madison, Cathy (February 9, 1993). "Coalition provides supportive voice". Ocala Star-Banner. 
  4. ^ "NCBW/Community Services Fund". National Coalition of 100 Black Women. Retrieved June 16, 2012. 

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