National Council for the Defense of Democracy

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National Council for the Defense of Democracy
Conseil National Pour la Défense de la Démocratie
President Léonard Nyangoma
Founded 24 September 1994
Ideology Hutu interests
Colors Blue, Red, Green
Senate
0 / 49
National Assembly
0 / 106
Party flag
Flag of the CNDD.svg
Politics of Burundi
Political parties
Elections

The National Council for the Defense of Democracy (French: Conseil National Pour la Défense de la Démocratie, CNDD) is a political party in Burundi.

History[edit]

The CNDD was established in Zaire on 24 September 1994 and was initially led by Léonard Nyangoma.[1][2] The party also established an armed wing, the Forces for the Defence of Democracy, which was involved in the country's ethnic conflict. In the early 2000s the party split, with a faction led by Pierre Nkurunziza becoming the National Council for the Defense of Democracy – Forces for the Defense of Democracy (CNDD–FDD). The CNDD held two ministerial posts in a unity government formed in 2001.[2]

In the 2005 parliamentary elections on 4 July the party received 4% of the vote, winning four of the 118 seats in the National Assembly, whilst the CNDD–FDD won 64.[3] It had performed strongly in local elections in June in Bururi, Nyangoma's home province,[4] receiving 4.2% of the national vote and winning 135 of the 3,225 local council seats across the country.[5] It subsequently won a single seat in the indirect Senate elections on 29 July, which was elected by colleges of local councillors.[6] However, Nyangoma went into exile the following year, before returning in 2007.

On 1 June 2010 the party was one of several that withdrew from the presidential elections scheduled for 28 June, accusing the Independent National Elections Commission of incompetence and a lack of impartiality.[7] Following the elections, Nyangoma went into exile again, fearing that his parliamentary immunity would be lifted.[7] The CNDD did not participate in the parliamentary elections on 23 July 2010.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tom Lansford (2014) Political Handbook of the World 2014 , CQ Press, p211
  2. ^ a b Party history CNDD (French)
  3. ^ Elections in Burundi Elections in Africa
  4. ^ Lansford, p214
  5. ^ Burundi: 2005 Communal election results EISA
  6. ^ Burundi Sénat (Senate): Elections held in 2005 IPU
  7. ^ a b Burundi: From electoral boycott to political impasse International Crisis Group
  8. ^ Burundi Inama Nshingamateka (National Assembly): Elections held in 2010 IPU

Externali links[edit]