National Film Award for Best Supporting Actor

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National Film Award for Best Supporting Actor
Type National
Category Indian Cinema
Description Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role
Instituted 1984
First awarded 1984
Last awarded 2013
Total awarded 31
Awarded by Directorate of Film Festivals
Cash award INR 50,000/-
Medal Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus)
First awardee(s) Victor Banerjee
Recent awardee(s) Saurabh Shukla

The National Film Award for Best Supporting Actor, officially known as the Rajat Kamal Award for the Best Supporting Actor is an honour presented annually at the National Film Awards of India since 1984 to an Actor for the best performance in a supporting role within the Indian cinema.[1][2] The National Film Awards were established in 1954 and are presented by the Directorate of Film Festivals, the organization set up by Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, India.[1] The National Film Awards instituted the "Best Supporting Actor" category in 1984 as the "Rajat Kamal Award for the Best Supporting Actor".[2]

It is one of several awards presented for feature films and the winners are awarded with a "Rajat Kamal" (Silver Lotus), certificate and a cash prize that amounted to INR50,000 (US$840). Throughout the years, accounting for ties and repeat winners, the Government of India has presented a total of 31 Best Supporting Actor awards to 28 different Actors. Although the Indian cinema produces films in more than 20 languages,[3] the Actors whose performances have won awards have worked in seven major languages: Bengali, Hindi, Malayalam, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada and Marathi.

The first recipient was Victor Banerjee, who was honoured at the 32nd National Film Award (1984) for his performance in the film Ghare Baire.[4] The actors who have won the most number of awards are Nana Patekar, Pankaj Kapur, and Atul Kulkarni with two. Nana Patekar won the awards for his performances in the Hindi films Parinda (1989) and Agni Sakshi (1996).[5] Pankaj Kapur won the awards for his performances in Hindi films Raakh (1988) and Maqbool (2003).[6] While Atul Kulkarni won the awards for his performances in the Tamil-Hindi film Hey Ram (1999) and the Hindi film Chandni Bar (2001). Manoj Bajpai is the youngest actor to win this honor for his performance in the Hindi film Satya (1998) respectively at the age of 30. Haradhan Bandopadhyay is the oldest actor to win this honour. He won the award for the Bengali film Krantikal in 2004 when he was 79. The most recent recipient is Saurabh Shukla, who will be honoured at the 61st National Film Awards ceremony for his performance in the film Jolly LLB.[7] Nana Patekar, Mithun Chakraborty, Prakash Raj, and Naseeruddin Shah are the only actors to win the National Film Award in this and Best Actor category.

Recipients[edit]

Nana Patekar is posing for the camera
Pankaj Kapur is posing for the camera
Atul Kulkarni is looking away from the camera
Nana Patekar (top), Pankaj Kapur (middle), and Atul Kulkarni (bottom) are the three actors to win the honour twice.
Aashish Vidyarthi is posing for the camera
Nagesh is posing for the camera
Ashish Vidyarthi (top) and Nagesh(bottom) tied in 1994 for their roles in Drohkaal (Commander Bhadra) and Nammavar (Mr. Rao).
Key
Symbol Meaning
dagger Indicates a joint award for that year
List of award recipients, showing the year, role(s), film(s) and language(s)
Year[I] Recipient(s) Role(s) Work(s) Language(s) Refs.[II]
1984
(32nd)
Victor Banerjee Nikhilesh Choudhury Ghare Baire Bengali [2]
1985
(33rd)
Deepankar De Unknown Paroma Bengali [8]
1986
(34th)
Suresh Oberoi Mukhi Mirch Masala Hindi [9]
1987
(35th)
Thilakan Unknown Rithubhedam Malayalam [10]
1988
(36th)
Pankaj Kapur Inspector P.K. Raakh Hindi [11]
1989
(37th)
Nana Patekar Anna Parinda Hindi [12]
1990
(38th)
Nedumudi Venu Maharaja Udayavarma His Highness Abdullah Malayalam [13]
1991
(39th)
P. L. Narayana Farmer Yagnam Telugu [14]
1992
(40th)
Sunny Deol Govind Damini – Lightning Hindi [15]
1993
(41st)
Paresh Rawal
  • Lalit Ramji
  • Velji
Hindi [16]
1994
(42nd)
Ashish Vidyarthi Commander Bhadra Drohkaal Hindi [17]
1994
(42nd)
Nagesh Mr. Rao Nammavar Tamil [17]
1995
(43rd)
Mithun Chakraborty Ramakrishna Swami Vivekananda Hindi [18]
1996
(44th)
Nana Patekar Vishwanath Agni Sakshi Hindi [19]
1997
(45th)
Prakash Raj Tamizhselvan Iruvar Tamil [20]
1998
(46th)
Manoj Bajpai Bhiku Mhatre Satya Hindi [21]
1999
(47th)
Atul Kulkarni Shriram Abhayankar Hey Ram Tamil / Hindi [22]
2000
(48th)
H. G. Dattatreya Hasanabba Munnudi Kannada [23]
2001
(49th)
Atul Kulkarni Pothya Sawant Chandni Bar Hindi [24]
2002
(50th)
Chandrasekhar Unknown Nanba Nanba Tamil [25]
2003
(51st)
Pankaj Kapur Jahangir Khan (Abbaji) Maqbool Hindi [26]
2004
(52nd)
Haradhan Bandopadhyay Unknown Krantikaal Bengali [27]
2005
(53rd)
Naseeruddin Shah Mohit Iqbal Hindi [28]
2006
(54th)
Dilip Prabhavalkar [29]
2007
(55th)
Darshan Jariwala Mahatma Gandhi Gandhi, My Father Hindi [30]
2008
(56th)
Arjun Rampal Joseph Mascarenhas (Joe) Rock On!! Hindi [31]
2009
(57th)
Farooq Sheikh S.K. Rao Lahore Hindi [32]
2010
(58th)
Thambi Ramaiah Ramaiah Mynaa Tamil [33]
2011
(59th)
Appukutty Azhagarsami Azhagarsamiyin Kuthirai Tamil [34]
2012
(60th)
Annu Kapoor Dr. Baldev Chaddha Vicky Donor Hindi [35]
2013
(61th)
Saurabh Shukla Justice Tripathi Jolly LLB Hindi [7]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

^[I] Year in which the film was censored by the Central Board of Film Certification.
^[II] The "Refs." cites the winner and the role played by them in the film.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About National Film Awards". Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved November 8, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "32nd National Film Awards – 1985" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 15. Retrieved November 8, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Central Board of Film Certification – Annual Report 2011" (PDF). Central Board of Film Certification. p. 33. Retrieved July 5, 2013. 
  4. ^ Chakravarty, Riya (May 3, 2013). "Indian cinema@100: 40 Firsts in Indian cinema". NDTV. Retrieved November 8, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Nana Patekar Awards". Oneindia. Retrieved 15 December 2013. 
  6. ^ "Manoj Bajpai wins National Award". Sify. 17 August 2004. Retrieved 15 December 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "61st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. 16 April 2014. Retrieved 16 April 2014. 
  8. ^ "33rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  9. ^ "34th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  10. ^ "35th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  11. ^ "36th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  12. ^ "37th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  13. ^ "38th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  14. ^ "39th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved February 27, 2012. 
  15. ^ "40th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 2, 2012. 
  16. ^ "41st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 3, 2012. 
  17. ^ a b "42nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 5, 2012. 
  18. ^ "43rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  19. ^ "44th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012. 
  20. ^ "45th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 11, 2012. 
  21. ^ "46th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 12, 2012. 
  22. ^ "47th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 13, 2012. 
  23. ^ "48th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 13, 2012. 
  24. ^ "49th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 14, 2012. 
  25. ^ "50th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 18–19. Retrieved March 14, 2012. 
  26. ^ "51st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 15, 2012. 
  27. ^ "52nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 28, 2012. 
  28. ^ "53rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 19, 2012. 
  29. ^ "54th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 24, 2012. 
  30. ^ "55th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 26, 2012. 
  31. ^ "56th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 27, 2012. 
  32. ^ "57th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 28, 2012. 
  33. ^ "58th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 29, 2012. 
  34. ^ "59th National Film Awards for the Year 2011 Announced". Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved March 7, 2012. 
  35. ^ "60th National Film Awards Announced" (PDF) (Press release). Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 

External links[edit]