National Health Council

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The National Health Council (NHC) is a nonprofit association of health organizations.[1]

Its members are national health-related organizations, including leading patient advocacy groups such as the American Cancer Society, the American Heart Association, the American Diabetes Association, and the Alzheimer's Association.

Other members include professional and membership associations, nonprofit organizations with an interest in health, and major health insurance, pharmaceutical, medical device, and biotechnology companies. Pharmaceutical company members include Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, and others.[2] The organization represents the more than 133 million people with chronic diseases and disabilities and their family caregivers.[3]

Founded in the 1920s,[4] the organization is headquartered in Washington, DC. Its activities include strengthening the work of patient advocacy organizations, developing public awareness and advocacy programs,[5] supporting health research,[6] and influencing the health care reform debate.[7][8]

Among the many federal and private entities it is involved in, the NHC is represented on the NCATS Cures Acceleration Network (CAN) Review Board,[9] Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s Advisory Panel on Patient Engagement,[10] Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP) Board of Advisors,[11] International Alliance of Patients’ Organizations Governing Board, Community Health Charities Board of Directors,[12] and the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Board of Directors.[13]

Latest Activities[edit]

The National Health Council represents the patient voice on various issues, such as the creation of patient-focused usability criteria in research[14] and advancing the development of new treatments and cures through passage of the MODDERN Cures Act.[15]

The NHC played a key role in lobbying for health care reform legislation in 2009 and 2010. For example the NHC sent numerous letters to members of Congress advocating for “Congress to enact meaningful health care reform legislation that meets the 5 Principles to Put Patients First.”[16] The Principles, as outlined on the NHC’s website are to “Cover Everyone, Curb Costs Responsibly, Abolish Exclusions of Pre-existing Conditions, Eliminate Lifetime Caps, and Ensure Access to Long-term and End-of-life Care.” [17]

In December 2008, the NHC and other organizations worked to set the selection criteria for the Obama Administration’s Food and Drug Administration commissioner.[18]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. “Healthfinder”. [1] Retrieved on 2009-01-04.
  2. ^ National Health Council. “Membership Directory”. [2] Retrieved on 2009-01-04.
  3. ^ The Power of Prevention, published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/publications/PowerOfPrevention/pdfs/2009-Power-of-Prevention.pdf
  4. ^ New York Times (October 9, 1922). “For World Health League.”
  5. ^ Public Broadcasting System. “Fred Friendly Seminars to raise awareness about the issues surrounding chronic illness.” [3] Retrieved on 2009-01-04.
  6. ^ National Institutes of Health. “Partner Organizations.” [4] Retrieved on 2009-01-04.
  7. ^ Pear, Robert. (July 9, 1998). “Health Agency Urged to Review Spending”. [5] New York Times.
  8. ^ Kaiser Network.Org. “Kaiser Daily Health Policy Report.” [6] Retrieved on 2009-01-04.
  9. ^ National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences Cures Acceleration Network Review Board [7]
  10. ^ Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s Advisory Panel on Patient Engagement [8]
  11. ^ Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP) Board of Advisors [9]
  12. ^ International Alliance of Patients’ Organizations Governing Board, Community Health Charities Board of Directors [10]
  13. ^ Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Board of Directors
  14. ^ Putting Patients First®: Paving a Path to Useful CER. (Sept. 30, 2013)
  15. ^ 113th Congress of the United State. HR 3116, MODDERN Cures Act of 2013
  16. ^ Letter to Congress, January 20, 2010 http://www.nationalhealthcouncil.org/NHC_Files/Pdf_Files/NHCLetter01202010_01-20-10.pdf
  17. ^ 5 Principles for Putting Patients First Document http://www.nationalhealthcouncil.org/forms/5-healthcare-principals.pdf
  18. ^ Wall Street Journal Public Resources (December 2008). Letter to Secretary Designate Thomas A. Daschle.[11]