National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

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The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) is part of the United States National Institutes of Health, which in turn is part of the Department of Health and Human Services. NIDDK is approximately the fifth-largest of the 27 NIH institutes.[1] The institute's mission is to support research, training, and communication with the public in the topic areas of "diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases, nutritional disorders, and obesity; and kidney, urologic, and hematologic diseases".[2] As of 2015, the Director of the institute is Dr. Griffin P. Rodgers, who assumed the position on an acting basis in 2006 and on a permanent basis in 2007.[3]

History[edit]

The institute that would become NIDDK was established in 1947 as the Experimental Biology and Medicine Institute, subsequently incorporated in 1950 by President Harry S Truman into the the National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases. The name of the institute was changed in 1972 to National Institute of Arthritis, Metabolism, and Digestive Diseases, again in 1981 to National Institute of Arthritis, Diabetes, and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and to its present name in 1986[2] following the creation of a separate National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS).[4]

Programs[edit]

The NIDDK intramural research program is divided into ten branches that perform basic and clinical research at locations in Bethesda, Maryland and Phoenix, Arizona.[2]

The extramural research program is divided into three divisions: Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases; Digestive Diseases and Nutrition; and Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases.

The NIDDK Office of the Director also administrates two notable programs: the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination, established to investigate disparities in health outcomes for minority groups, and the Office of Obesity Research, which organizes research into obesity and metabolic diseases.

The Institute also conducts public health awareness campaigns on common, underdiagnosed, undertreated diseases within its purview.[2]

Central Repository[edit]

In 2003, NIDDK established a Central Repository to share biological samples and research data with the research community. The three components - the Data, Biosample, and Genetic Repositories - accept submissions of database archives, biological specimens, and blood and DNA samples, respectively, and are responsible for proper storage, maintenance, and distribution of requested materials to qualified researchers.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases". National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved 15 March 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d "National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases". The NIH Almanac. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved 15 March 2015. 
  3. ^ "Director's Biography". National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved 15 March 2015. 
  4. ^ "National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases". The NIH Almanac. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved 15 March 2015. 
  5. ^ "NIDDK Central Repository". National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved 15 March 2015. 

External links[edit]