National Newspaper Association

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National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper Association logo.png
Founded February 19, 1885 (1885-02-19)
Founder Benjamin Briggs Herbert
Type Trade association
Location
Area served United States
Members c. 2,300
Mission "To protect, promote, and enhance America's community newspapers."
Website nnaweb.org/index.php
[1]

The National Newspaper Association (NNA) is a Columbia, Missouri based non-profit newspaper trade association founded in 1885.[2][3] The organization has over 2,300 members, making it the largest newspaper trade association in the United States.[4] The organization has two major offices, one in Columbia, Missouri, and the other in Falls Church, Virginia.[5]

History[edit]

The National Newspaper Association was founded by Benjamin Briggs Herbert on February 19, 1885, as the National Editorial Association (NEA) in New Orleans, Louisiana.[1][6][7] The NEA's constitution was ratified after a meeting in 1886 and Benjamin Briggs Herbert was elected president of the organization.[8][9] In 1891, E.W. Stephens became the sixth president of National Editorial Association after a discussion at the organization's seventh annual convention.[9][10][11] The National Editorial Association changed its name to the National Newspaper Association after a Dallas, Texas meeting in 1964.[12]

Conventions[edit]

Since the organization's founding, the National Newspaper Association has held an annual news convention.[13][14] At the conventions, newspaper editors meet and discuss various publishing related topics.[15][16] An informal convention had taken place in New Orleans after the organization's founding.[17] The organization's first formal convention took place on February 23, 1886 in Cincinnati, Ohio.[18][19]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About the NNA / Contacts". National Newspaper Association. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Alabama publisher to head National Newspaper Association". The Montgomery Independent. September 29, 2008. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  3. ^ Jones, Charisse (February 7, 2008). "Some public notices find home on Web". USA Today. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Publisher Reppert now president of NNA". The Southeast Missourian. October 3, 2005. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  5. ^ Keane, Angela Greiling (December 7, 2011). "Postal Service Seeks to Slow U.S. Mail Delivery to Cut Costs". Bloomberg Businessweek. Retrieved March 9, 2012. 
  6. ^ Haskin, Frederic J. (May 25, 1935). "Questions of Readers Answered". The Hartford Courant. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Editorial Association Elects Massachusetts Publisher". The New York Times. June 28, 1964. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  8. ^ Edwin Emery (November 1970). History of the American Newspaper Publishers Association. Greenwood Press. p. 18. Retrieved March 7, 2012. 
  9. ^ a b Official proceedings of the annual convention 24. National Newspaper Association. 1909. p. 3. Retrieved March 7, 2012. 
  10. ^ "A Day of Conventions". The Baltimore Sun. July 15, 1891. Retrieved March 7, 2012. 
  11. ^ Betty Houchin Winfield (September 3, 2008). Journalism, 1908: Birth of a Profession. University of Missouri Press. p. 79. ISBN 978-0-8262-1811-7. Retrieved March 7, 2012. 
  12. ^ Karolevitz, Robert F. (1985). From quill to computer: The story of America's community newspapers: Commemorating the centennial of the National Newspaper Association. Pine Hill Press. p. 168. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  13. ^ "National Editorial Association in Boston". Manufacturers and Farmers Journal. June 26, 1890. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Asbury Park is Wide Awake". The New York Times. June 17, 1894. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  15. ^ "How the Editors Feel: Members of the National Association Nearly All Favor Clevland". The New York Times. May 10, 1892. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Treats for the Editors: Plans for Entertaining the National Association". The New York Times. July 6, 1894. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  17. ^ Curtiss-Wedge, Franklyn (1909). History of Goodhue County, Minnesota. H.C. Cooper. p. 662. Retrieved March 7, 2012. 
  18. ^ Official proceedings of the annual convention. 15-16. National Newspaper Association. 1900. p. 61. Retrieved March 7, 2012. 
  19. ^ Official proceedings. 43-44. National Editorial Association. p. 39. Retrieved March 7, 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]